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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello,
I was hoping to get some advice on an idea I have to fix a dead-spot which is causing a chronic roof leak on an old house I am working-on (see attached ROOFPLAN.pdf).
It has an original gable roof, which was later added-on-to with another gabled-roof area in an L-shape on one end.
Later, another gable-roofed addition was built making it a U-shaped end which slopes on 3 sides in a flat area with roll roofing at the bottom. This flat area is causing a chronic roof leak every few months.
I am considering proposing building a room with a raised metal flat roof coming-up from the existing ridges on the three sides and removing the existing roof in that area. I'm thinking I could add this flat section in the center of the front and back sloping roofs and still keep the roof strong enough, but I'm not 100% positive. Any advice will be appreciated.
Thanks,
William C
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, I may do that, but I'm also a little concerned about the amount of water that flows out of the flat spot into the side of the existing pitched shingle roof. In a good rain, I'm thinking water could be running up under the shingles there and getting inside the attic that way.
 

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Either way still requires a proper roof system, why complicate it by framing all that in....only to put a roof on it anyway.

metal or single ply or 3 ply modbit whatever floats your boat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes I believe the interior walls couldn't handle the load as-is, but I was thinking I could add some of those 3" dia steel permanent columns to carry the added loading.
This is a real preliminary idea for now, but it did look to me, like the roof structure would still be OK, since basically in section I'd be creating two triangles with a square in between them. This seems like it'd be as sound as the two separate pitched roofs are now and I'd be able to eliminate that dead spot that's been a chronic PIA for a while.
For sure, I'd get a structural engineer to take a look at it before cutting-out anything. Thanks for the comments.
William C.
 

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Yes I believe the interior walls couldn't handle the load as-is, but I was thinking I could add some of those 3" dia steel permanent columns to carry the added loading.
This is a real preliminary idea for now, but it did look to me, like the roof structure would still be OK, since basically in section I'd be creating two triangles with a square in between them. This seems like it'd be as sound as the two separate pitched roofs are now and I'd be able to eliminate that dead spot that's been a chronic PIA for a while.
For sure, I'd get a structural engineer to take a look at it before cutting-out anything. Thanks for the comments.
William C.
This design is not exactly breaking new engineering ground or pushing the envelope of residential engineering.
This could be done prescriptively, no engineered design. Depending upon where it is located of course.
Being on the 2nd floor engineering would be required in Calif. Wash. & Oregon though as well as other seismic areas.

Andy.
 
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