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Hello there. I am a contractor remodeling a home I bought. I am replacing joists that are set inside a block wall. I know treated is standard when dealing with concrete/block what can I do to add some sort of a sill barrier and can I do something so I dont have to buy all treated joists? You can see in the picture where the old joists were they rotted out. Appreciate any help.
508052
 

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You have to check the code for your area. Something like PT us required based on masonry contact and/or proximity to ground. If you're OK with the proximity, you can use any wicking break - galvi metal wrap would be typical around here.
 

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Design Build
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Why do the joists need to go back into the pockets?
Maybe they can be set on a knee wall inside the foundation.
Is the PT lumber in your area bad quality or are you just trying to save a few $$$?

What's your trade/experience?
 

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Highwayman
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Looks like you have a lot of issues going on there


The block appears to be in fairly poor condition. The head joints are disintegrating. There are some block with pieces missing.

The bottom plate is split and needs to be repaired.

The drywall needs to be replaced.

While you are doing all this work, you have a few options. You can reframe with PT, you can wrap the ends with Vycor or other peel-and-stick membrane, you can use sheet metal like Davis mentioned, you can install a ledger of top of the block of ceiling/floor height will not be an issue, or you can fasten a ledger onto the block after it’s repaired.

Way it looks right now, that block wouldn’t hold a ledger.

Or you could frame a wall on the inside of the basement, and run the joists off of that.

Are you interested in doing this right, or is this a flip?
 

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Goin' Down in Flames....
Highwayman
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You might also be able to just remove that top row of block and frame a standard floor on there.

Fix your plate problem at the same time.
 

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I can never understand why they thought it was a good Ideal to do that with joists. A lot of older house around here have the joists poured in the concrete walls. And now have rotten joists and rotten concrete. I would never buy a house done this way.

Another thing person might be able to do is finish cut that plate even with the sheet rock wall. Clean out in between the blocks put a form on the block and pour some concrete in there. .
 

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Every time I have some realtor tell me how I ought to be flipping houses instead of building new I think of photos like this one. What a mess.
 

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is termite damage present? kind of looks like termite tubes but hard to tell with the picture.

if you're in an area that has termites, go with PT.
 

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I can never understand why they thought it was a good Ideal to do that with joists. A lot of older house around here have the joists poured in the concrete walls. And now have rotten joists and rotten concrete. I would never buy a house done this way.

Another thing person might be able to do is finish cut that plate even with the sheet rock wall. Clean out in between the blocks put a form on the block and pour some concrete in there. .
I've seen some janky stuff on the War Boxes around here but never Joists formed into the stem walls. That's silly on so many reasons. Post/pier builds on clay brick footings or a sideways 8 x 10 block but dang.
 

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The only time I have seen it done is if the house was built on a slope and the ground was higher than the floor level on the block side. But then I would rather see wider block below the joist level.
 
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