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This could be a questions for you painters out there. I have re painted old existing kitchen cabinets a few different times and I have never been happy with the end results.

So my question is what would be the best process for re painting old stained cabinets and getting a new looking finish?
 

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Radical Basement Dweller
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If I had to paint stained cabinets I would probably opt for spraying lacquer.
The key to getting a great final result is in the amount of prep done before applying the finish, regardless of the type of finish you go with.
 

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I did this on my personal home when I redid my 20 year old kitchen, & used old cabs for my fin bas bar. I first wiped down surfaces with a marron scotch pad soaked in laquer thinner, or acetone, depending on original finish. This evened/thinned out to finish at chipped/damaged areas, so the top coat would be seamless. I then block planed/sanded any bad edges. Then I stained edges, & scratches as needed to get a uniform look in stain tone. Then it was a one coat with Aqua Coat wb finish. They turned out looking like new! :thumbup:

Joe
 

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The Duke
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Yes of course. Leo and I use it exclusively. MagnaMax is a great Lacquer. The other stuff I haven't seen but I'm guessing it is a vinyl sealer.

It's potent. Not sure you'd want to use it inside on a customers home unless they are gone for a week.
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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You want a new look finish. You are going to have to strip the old finish off.
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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Yes of course. Leo and I use it exclusively. MagnaMax is a great Lacquer. The other stuff I haven't seen but I'm guessing it is a vinyl sealer.

It's potent. Not sure you'd want to use it inside on a customers home unless they are gone for a week.
I haven't used MM in over a year. I switched over to MagnaKlear and had a few issues and now it's Krystal.
 

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Custom
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Magnamnax is great... personally, unless someone is married to the style they have, we don't bother with stripping, sanding, etc.. anymore... more cost effective, quicker and better results, and you can update the look completely with new fronts...
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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Essentially the same thing as stripping. You are getting down to bare wood, only the easy way :w00t:
 

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The Duke
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I haven't used MM in over a year. I switched over to MagnaKlear and had a few issues and now it's Krystal.
I have used MM a few times and I like it, but the vast majority of what I spray is Krystal for clear and Resistant for opaque.

I don't know about the WVP stuff though. I don't use it since I don't re-finish.
 

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30 year novice
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Boom

If that lacquer is a solvent base I would not spray it inside a home. Vapors + flame = boom!!!!!!! :whistling Back to the original question. If you're going to go from a stained door to a painted one then this is what I do. Remove the doors and hardware, clean them very well ( I usually use a product call liquid sandpaper, it de glosses and pulls the grease and grime off), sand them well and repair any flaws and sand them when dry. I use BIN as a primer, it sticks to anything I've come across. Sand and then apply 2 coats of color, I use a latex eggshell paint for this. The final coat is a Target coatings product EM6000, it's a water base lacquer. I would not spray the BIN on site though, all my spraying is done in a booth.
 

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Da Boss....
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Easy
 

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