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OK, I've got a couple that wants their tub re-finished. I can handle the spraying part, but it's the product that leaves me questioning.

Does anyone have any recommendations for the type of epoxy to use for this project? It's been at least a few years since I've even touched a job like this, but it's a quick, lucrative task....What do you recommend? The tub has allready been stripped with muriatic acid. I will probably do another acid cleaning before re-finishing because it looks like hell. The homeowner did it the first time, doh!

Any other tips would be greatly appreciated, and I'm sure this is a good topic for others to reference in the future. Thanks!! :Thumbs:
 

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I use marine grade Tile clad two part epoxy, in the past with good results, been over 5 years and the tube and surround are as good as the day it was sprayed.

what is the tub made of?
 

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Sounds like a fun gig I love working on before my time stuff.
I would sand the entire surface with 100 grit or higher and etch with acid then wipe down with alcohol

I would talk to my Sherman William's rep and ask if the tile clad would be your best option. That way if the product fails you have them to back you up.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hey thanks! I will give her a good sanding for sure....don't want imperfections. I want an epoxy coat that's smooth as glass, no orange peel either. That's no prob....but you were a big help with the product selection. I just checked the online coating systems catalog for industrial equipment coatings on ferrous metal and it said exactly what you did. It also recommends the Tile-Clad HS. Only difference is they recommend preceding it with a coat of Macropoxy 646 as a base.

I like to be by the book, and it sounds like you read that particular book, lol! Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
plumguy said:
Check this site out. They sell the paint and the bonding agent.

www.refinishingonline.com
Hey plumguy! Thanks for the input. Are those professional grade products/systems? I am looking into the website now, but I have reservations because I have seen what the DIY kits can do to a tub!!! :eek:
 

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To be honest I don't know! It is a referal site for pro's who refinish and I think the products they use that are also sold to the DIYer.
 

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What I did recently was to use a reducer for the first coat and then followed by a pure coat. Also if you go with the Macropoxy 646 I would give it a 24 hour dry period before putting your finish coats. Just my opinion :rolleyes:

Also make sure this room is well box off and try and ventilate as much as you can. This stuff will put a hurt on anything it touches. Only thing that removes it is the reducer smells like rocket fuel. The epoxy will be just as bad make sure to tell the HO to be prepared to smell this stuff for a few days.

I always run a Ionic carona discharge unit in the room for 24 hr when I am done to kill the odor
 

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Warning!
I have been playing with epoxies for over 30 yrs. and you can become sensitized, meaning that you will never be able to get near this stuff again without encountering breathing problems and skin lesions. Fair skinned people generally go first and often after only a few exposures. This only applies to uncured epoxies, most epoxies cure in about 48 hrs. Once fully cured, they are pretty much innocuous.
Prior to full cure, they will chemically bond to themselves. If allowed to cure completely, you will have to provide 'tooth' (sanding) for the next coat to physically bond to.
I try to avoid anything that advances transdermal delivery. Alcohol is widely recommended for cleanup, vinegar is cheaper and does just as well. Follow up with a good soap and water washing using either.
For more info, ask me or check out the web. This IS serious stuff and downplayed way too much.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hey, thanks again. I know the fumes are going to be a killer, I'll be sure to remind them (thanks for reminding ME)....the entire surrounding area will be properly masked and protected, no worries there. Here's a quote from a re-finishing site I found earlier. Tell me what you think about the product it speaks of, or if you know anything about it:

This is the finished product. The chemical we use is an Aliphatic Acrylic Polyurethane Enamel,which is the ONLY chemical that should be used in our industry, and is used by 95%of the professional refinishing companies throughout the USA.
 

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Teetorbilt said:
Warning!
I have been playing with epoxies for over 30 yrs. and you can become sensitized, meaning that you will never be able to get near this stuff again without encountering breathing problems and skin lesions. Fair skinned people generally go first and often after only a few exposures. This only applies to uncured epoxies, most epoxies cure in about 48 hrs. Once fully cured, they are pretty much innocuous.
Prior to full cure, they will chemically bond to themselves. If allowed to cure completely, you will have to provide 'tooth' (sanding) for the next coat to physically bond to.
I try to avoid anything that advances transdermal delivery. Alcohol is widely recommended for cleanup, vinegar is cheaper and does just as well. Follow up with a good soap and water washing using either.
For more info, ask me or check out the web. This IS serious stuff and downplayed way too much.
Alcohol and or vinegar for clean up? I will have to try that.
Yes sir this in not a DIY job. Use caution!!!!
 

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AA, polyurethane is your base. There are far fewer worries here than with epoxies although humidity becomes a factor as poly's will absorb humidity, You may want to check into dessicants, it's a powder that you add in.
Polyurethanes are softer than epoxies which also has its good and bad points.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Teetorbilt said:
AA, polyurethane is your base. There are far fewer worries here than with epoxies although humidity becomes a factor as poly's will absorb humidity, You may want to check into dessicants, it's a powder that you add in.
Polyurethanes are softer than epoxies which also has its good and bad points.
You think I should go with a poly instead? I'm no stranger to them just never heard of "alaphatic" polys. Please tell me more... :Thumbs:
 

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Without going into great detail, it means that it is a waterbased system and relates to paints.
I dealt with coatings and castings, I can't say much beyond that.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Oh, ok, now I'm catchin' up to speed. I understand waterborne urethanes used on things like water towers and the like in industrial application. That term "allaphatic" has never crossed my lips before though, lol! :cheesygri

The old school of thought that taught me has me leaning steadily in the epoxy direction because you can achieve higher build per coat to hide minor imperfections, and better durability is a given...
 

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Just to give you an idea of what epoxies are like, 60# generally gives you the best 'tooth'. Epoxies can fill in the gaps and give you a near glass finish.
 
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