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I have not seen that product before but damn that is a big block! Makes the 80-120 lb block that we use look like toys. What is the application you are planning to us it for?
 

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Looks like a smaller version of stone strong wall system. I hope it is more cost effective. I could buy versalok block & have the installation subbed out & still make money for less than the cost of the stone strong block alone.
 

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I've never seen that product either. I'm sure it has it's perks but I still like versa-lok because it's so simple (same blocks for steps, inside and outside curves, and there's no top middle and bottom block.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Were going to be removing the existing retaining wall and cutting back into the hillside approx 10' more. Approx new wall height would be 35' or so. Existing garage is going also.
 

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Just stacking common big concrete will not fly for a 35' high wall in a seismic area. You will need some engineering to make it work.

Redi Rock is just a gravity wall, that will not be accepted by any inspector, building official or any sane future purchaser.

I have seen 45' high walls about a mile or two long built using the smaller segmental retaining wall block, but they were engineered. These were along a freeway in Europe in a mountainous area.

You need to spend a dollar or two on engineering and planning considering the location and the investment. If not done right, it could also be washed out , pulling down everything above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I do understand what's involved with regards to engineering-soils and so forth, I've been meeting with various engineers for the last few weeks and some have bought up the Redi-rock idea.
I was just curious if anyone on here has used them before.
 

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Does redi rock include the engineering in the product price? Versa-lok & stone strong both included all engineering including stamped plans when I priced there products.

What's the tallest wall you've installed? I would think it would cost a few bucks to do that job.

Good luck:thumbsup:
 

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Serrano,

Not sure what soil types you have there but here in Atlanta everything is considered clay unless proven otherwise so my information is based on our soil conditions. Whenever we have a slope above (or below) a wall the grid lengths for most SRW are approx. 120% of the wall height.

In looking at the standard design charts for clayey soil with a 2.5:1 slope above the wall the grids are 133% of the wall height. Not sure what advantage you are getting from this block other than it can be installed without grid taller than most other SRWs.


From the looks of the picture you have at least a 2:1 slope behind the wall and additional loads from the home above. With a 35' wall your grids are going to be at least 42-45' from the face of the wall. From the picture I can not see where there is room to excavate 45' and keep the house above stable.

If he engineers have not mentioned already, you will most likely have to use soil nails/anchors embedded into bank behind then tie the grids to the anchors. This eliminates most of the grid/excavation but they are not cheap.

Hope this helps!
 

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Just wondering what the prices of the Redi-Rock & Versi-loc are compared to like the smaller Keystone type SRW are per sf? I know here the Keystone generic brand is going for about $12/face/sf.

I also am curious about the "big block" walls.
 

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i've used Redi-rock many times. It's a great product. you can go 12 foot high with no geogrid. I've quoted as high as 24 foot with no geogrid, but using flowable fill to increase the mass of the wall. (Engineered that way). I timed a sea wall we did a couple years ago with the blocks being in the right place we could install 5.75 sqft (one block) every 38 seconds with two operators and two laborers. I think it's just a lot easier to let equipment do the work rather than laborers, so i prefer this brand and style.
 

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Hi,

I am going to start my business as a big size precast concrete retaining wall blocks manufacturer and installer in Vancouver, BC Canada.
I am dealing with 2 different companies "Redi-Rock & Verti-Block".
But so far, I could not make my final decision for getting forms & license from one of them.

Now, I would be grateful if you could answer the following questions and help me.
As a professional :

1. What do you recommend? small size retaining wall blocks or big size retaining wall blocks?
2. If your answer is small size retaining wall blocks, which brand do you recommend first? (Allan Block or Anchor walls or Versa-Lok...)
3. If your answer is big size retaining wall, which type ( solid or hollow) and which brand do you recommend?
a. Solid blocks such as (Redi-Rock , ReCon , Lock-Block , ...)
b. Hollow blocks such as (Stone Strong , Verti -block ,...)
4. From a contractor's standpoint: which one they prefer more (small blocks or big blocks , and which brand)
5. From a customer's standpoint which one they prefer (small size blocks or big size blocks , and which brand)
6. Do you have any idea about Green Retaining Wall Blocks
7. Price -------------->>> Redi-Rock per sqft = $ ...... Allan Block per sqft = $ ......
Thank you for your time and your consideration. I look forward to hearing from you.
Regards,
Nick
 

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I know this is an old thread, but since it was brought back from the dead, I would like to point out the liability issue there. That is a tall slope with a house up above. Heavy rains and poor soil conditions could cause failure of the existing soil causing a landslide during construction. I would definite hire a geo-technical company to do testing and have the wall engineered. I would also recommend sheet piling before demo'ing the existing wall. Furthermore, sheet pile it , drive soldier piers for strength and put some cultured stone on it and forget it.
 

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Hi,

I am going to start my business as a big size precast concrete retaining wall blocks manufacturer and installer in Vancouver, BC Canada.
I am dealing with 2 different companies "Redi-Rock & Verti-Block".
But so far, I could not make my final decision for getting forms & license from one of them.

Now, I would be grateful if you could answer the following questions and help me.
As a professional :

1. What do you recommend? small size retaining wall blocks or big size retaining wall blocks?
2. If your answer is small size retaining wall blocks, which brand do you recommend first? (Allan Block or Anchor walls or Versa-Lok...)
3. If your answer is big size retaining wall, which type ( solid or hollow) and which brand do you recommend?
a. Solid blocks such as (Redi-Rock , ReCon , Lock-Block , ...)
b. Hollow blocks such as (Stone Strong , Verti -block ,...)
4. From a contractor's standpoint: which one they prefer more (small blocks or big blocks , and which brand)
5. From a customer's standpoint which one they prefer (small size blocks or big size blocks , and which brand)
6. Do you have any idea about Green Retaining Wall Blocks
7. Price -------------->>> Redi-Rock per sqft = $ ...... Allan Block per sqft = $ ......
Thank you for your time and your consideration. I look forward to hearing from you.
Regards,
Nick
 

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i have done 3 redi rock walls in the last year. none of the height asked about by the original poster. i prefer these blocks to the segmental blocks because when bidding segmental block it seems i am bidding against every mexican or fly by night company. also, when i bring up engineering to the client they look at me like i am from mars on the segmental walls. i guess this is because the fly by nights don't care about engineering. once the base is set redi rick goes up fast. it does require heavy equipment to move the block. i have jobs already accepted for 2 more walls by the end of the year. very glad i found out and startedusing these blocks. i don't even bid segmental anymore.
 

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It all depends on how deep your pockets are and how much you want do as far as marketing, selling and the size of inventory you can handle (land and money).

Anybody can easily get into the large block market, because of the low investment and technology BUT the market is much smaller and expanding it calls for marketing and sales (not selling or price). You can just buy some forms, but your capacity will be limited by the number of forms. You can always forget about a batch plant, aggregate, mixer, etc. and just buy the concrete from a ready-mix company cheaper than you can make it. The down side is that the ready-mix companies can get into the same business cheaply and compete with you.

Trying to develop a market for whatever large unit you choose, will take time and money and not just a cheap unit price. Depending on the area the other types of retaining wall systems may be established in the market with dealers and acceptable approvals. The existing markets require diversified products and applications.

If you are interested in the smaller SRW units (under 80#), you are looking at a big investment. You can buy an old concrete block plant (if available) for about $2,000,000 that can also make other products. The alternate is to buy the equipment for a new block operation for about $3,000,000 to $5,000,000 and then get the land and zoning.

As far as the major 4 SRW brands (Allan, Anchor, Keystone and Versalok), generally they do not manufacture blocks, but have developed the products, tested, written ASTM specs, matketed their systems, trained manufacturers and supported users, and contractors when needed both internationally and domestically. Check on the availability of the possibility of getting an exclusive manufacturing area license for your area (usually about 50-100 mile radius). The license precludes making competitive products. Most of the major metro areas are taken but adjacent areas are available and freight cost is less per sf for these type of products than other types (large). You can always come up with a "knock-off" similar product and face the eventual law suits because the domestic and international patents are very tight.

Regarding you last question, price of the product itself is not factor because the decision on an appearance is made befor buying. The wall heights are also not a major factor since the SRWs have been built on engineered projects that were 45' high.
 

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Redi-Rock

I work with Redi-Rock for my job. I use to work for CSG in MN designing all types of SRW, PMB and boulder retaining walls. I now sell Redi-Rock for one of CSG's clients.

Redi-Rock is the leader in the PMB (Pre-cast Modular Block) systems. Our new "PC" system meets the new AASHTO LRFD specs. We're DOT approved all over the country...with more states coming on board all the time.

As far as questions go regarding pricing that I saw in this thread - it all depends on the site conditions. We're actually MORE economical that a smaller SRW system in rock cut situations...or in site where the crappy soils have to be exported. Keep that in mind when you're comparing pricing and be sure to include all the costs associated with each system so you're comparing "apples to apples". We are installing one that we VE'd for KYTC and are saving over $700K over the poured in place walls that were specified for that one.

Something else to keep in mind, the more critical the wall structure, the more you're going to want the mass of a PMB system. Think about all the structures that have been on the planet for thousands of years; the Pyramids, the Roman Aqueducts, the Great Wall of China...ALL build with BIG BLOCKS! SRW blocks are "dry cast" concrete mixes that allow more moisture in the units - which is not a good thing in areas with freeze-thaw cycles. I have pictures of an SRW at a Walmart on the corner of Richmond Rd and Man O' War in Lexington, KY where the bottom 5-6 courses totally disintegrated due to saturation and freeze/thaw effects broke those units down to nothing. There another example in Colorado where the snow blowers out there tossed snow and road salts onto the face of the blocks...then you have warm day temps, and freezing night temps - which ended up eating away those walls so that it looks like there's caves in the walls...and those were only up a couple years before they started failing.

Is it for everyone? No. I am constantly turning residential customers onto the cheaper SRW systems as I know they don't have the budget of a commercial or muni endeavor. It is an awesome solution for critical structures though. I have a 21' tall, normal batter gravity wall in Lexington on Clays Mill Road, and a 25' tall gravity wall with 5 courses of our 9" setback units at the emergency tower for the town of Pikeville, KY. And, we've build the tallest PC wall in the world to date at the Parklands of Floyds Fork in Louisville with zero batter walls, a pedestrian tunnel through the wall, and a roadway 3' off the top of the wall.

Check out www.redi-rock.com for a local producer in your area.
 
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