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Professional Instigator
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6,872 Posts
The math or why we go by 48 bar diameters?

The math is 48 x 5/8" (Because a #5 bar is 5/8" diameter)

and 48 x 5/8" = 30", so that would be the overlap.

if you had #8 bars, it would be 48 x 1", so a 48" overlap.

The larger the bar, the more overlap that is needed.
Who's code is that. That is not DC code on over laps? is that florida Code?
 

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Pompass Ass
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2,090 Posts
I was there when it snowed one year in miami, south florida really remember that??
I know we had some snow 1/4" in Tampa around 1976, I didn't realize it snowed in Miami as well.

In the late 80's we had some snow flurries, but it didn't stick, it looked like someone threw sand on my truck, some areas lost power for 3 days and people were freaking out.
 

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Professional Instigator
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6,872 Posts
I know we had some snow 1/4" in Tampa around 1976, I didn't realize it snowed in Miami as well.

In the late 80's we had some snow flurries, but it didn't stick, it looked like someone threw sand on my truck, some areas lost power for 3 days and people were freaking out.
86 and 89.
 

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Registered
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3,379 Posts
The rebar overlap must transfer the tesile loads from onr piece to another. In many cases, wind (can be more severe for tension on a what that some seismic areas have. Local code ammendments can be more resrictive the the model code, which are the worst you can build to and still be legal, but local conditions can be more restrictive.

Ever looked at the coastal requirement if your area are in "hurricane area"? Tie downs, windows and garage doors can be tough to meet.
 
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