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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am just getting started with my own business. My father has been in the remodel business for 20 years. As a kid I spent many summers working for him. Now I have several small projects started on my own.

I did some waynes coating and crown for a friend and his contractor liked my work. He has hired me on one of his jobs and wants to know my hourly rate. I am novice at the pricing aspect of the job. I don't want to over charge or under charge but to be fair, as I want more business from him. He has supplied all the materials and some tools.

At this point your are asking why I don't just ask my father? He lives in the country and I am in San Francisco where the average one bedroom home is $700k. So his prices are far lower then the cost of living wage @ Taco Bell.

Job includes.

1. Stringer trim.1 stair case
2. Window Trim 13 windows
3. Crown molding 4 rooms
4. Base Molding 4 room and two hallways.

Whats the average rate per hour? :cool: :cool:
 

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Ask him what he was paying his last carpenter. That doesn't mean you accept this price, it just means you don't under bid yourself :)

Next figure out how much YOU want to make an hour. Now figure in your overhead. Your overhead are things like your truck payment and depreciation. Your gas for your truck. Your cell phone, and or office phones. Any advertising is also considered overhead. Heck! Any expense you have in relation to keeping your doors open, but can't bill to any specific job is overhead. INsurance, liscenses, advertising, rent, utilities, tool depreciation etc...

Now add all that up for a full year. Divide by 52 weeks. This gives you your weekly overhead. Now divide by 40. This gives you your hourly overhead! Even if you work more than 40 hours, just use the 40 hour number!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thanks Grumpy

I figured out that $35 an hour would be a reasonable hourly rate to charge based on your figures. I also cut this rate down a few dollars to keep it
attactive.

Thanks again for all you help. :Thumbs:
 

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RHD,
If you can tell me the equivalent of your full-time year's experience and skill set, I can give you an idea at what rate a tradesman staffing company would bill you out to a contractor in the Chicago area. I can't guarantee it, but you should consider it a guide. I would then add on top of that as CA has awful costs in the way of insurance that increases hourly rates (which contractors should be used to).

Tim
 

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It really does depend on your skill and experience.
Having to borrow tools is not a good sign. The price is greatly reduced if you do that. Builders like to see that you are self sufficient before they start paying the top dollars. When borrowing tools and of medium experience, $35.00 per hour is the max you can get. No tools borrowed and high experience, $50-$75 per hour.
Most importantly, it is dependant on his budget. You might want to subcontract the whole job, not using a hourly rate and then you could make more that way.
 

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roofer

"Yo're not a roofer are ya?"

No, I need to sleep at night. ;) :D

Tim
 

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rum

"I'm kidding I'm kidding... I prefer rum"

Lol. We got a couple ummm "fascinating" home construction projects in the far west/far southwest area out here that. After going out there and seeing the "quality" of their work I want to put a sign on the job "The Captain was here."

Tim
 
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