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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Does anyone have any suggestions or methods for raising the grade of a lawn along vinyl siding? I figure we'd need to raise the siding and flash it somehow, but wondered if anyone has any proven methods to avoid rotted framing. We need to build the grade up approximately 8" along both of these walls. (On a side note, why can't builders simply build houses 12" higher! :wallbash: )

https://dyp.im/ad4A2yGAzo

https://dyp.im/SdDRviGX3p
 

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You'd be much better off removing 8",and having that grade reworked so all the run off goes towards the lowest point away from the foundation.
Looks like piss poor planning by the builder,but a good excavator should be able to swail around that house for proper drainage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks oldfrt. This particular house presents some challenges to cutting away...the swayle would really be an annoyance in the yard because of how things slope. I guess I was hoping that someone has come up with a method for protecting the wall from the exterior so that fill could be added against the house. Flashing it from the top would be relatively simple, but we'd need to avoid wicking and the moisture penetration from below. Does Azek or a similar material withstand ground contact?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Any thoughts on this sort of idea? (Sorry for the crude "MS Paint" sketch!)


https://dumpyourphoto.com/photo/NmcF9xq1hs

It's success or failure would depend on a few key factors:

1) How well does Azek withstand ground contact?
2) How well would sill seal & caulk deal with the same?
3) Azek joints would need to be scarf joints with glue to prevent separation
4) All flashing details would need to be meticulous, and the house would need to either have house wrap installed, or it would need to be added. We wouldn't want water getting trapped in there.
5) How long would it be before the homeowner piled the dirt and mulch above the level of the modification?

Perhaps there are good reasons this has never been done, but I'm too stubborn to give up just yet!
 

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You seem hell bent on screwing this up,and I don't think I, or any else here is going to assist in doing so.

No matter how efficient you are in keeping water out temporarily,since any caulk will fail in time,there are other things to consider.
Any portion of that wall that is below grade will be constantly damp.Then as the moisture migrates inward to the sill,band joist,and studs you'll have a very expensive repair bill a very short time.
Now if this migrates into the wallboard,there will be mold issues.

You will be making a bad situation worse.

Talk to an excavator who has dealt with a similar issue,you may be surprised at what can be done.
 

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Kev.... my daughter and probably 30-40 production homes in Tiburon have exactly the same issue.

She's new to her old home (1953) and we are presently evaluating options relative to her exact elevations.

One, I sure agree with Oldfrt and Lone (although I thougt that was a sliding window in the pic)..... You would never get, or maintain, an external moisture barrier that would last.... and the failure could be very expensive.

We've looked over some of the things other owners have done... some have been able to get a shallow swale in to mitigate the heavy rains...

Most have gone with a mixture/balance of subtle swail, french drains and surface drains leading to a yard sump pump.

Besides a "foundation" french drain, many have placed french drains in their shallow swale.... sometimes grassed over and sometimes riverrocked over..... depending exactly on their elevations.

My daughters neighbor actually put in a hugh back yard tile patio... sloped away from home and directly into a sump pit (We're trying to figure out how to grade my daughters runoff into her neighbors sump:eek:.... just kidding)

One party has a checkerboard webb of french drains (sorta like a reverse leach field) leading to a backyard sump...

Another guy dug out (graded down) the middle of his backyard and put in a rock garden with a water feature (and sump) in effect disguising his grading which is a big-wide shallow hole basically.

On top of the level/low lot problem, we've got gophers.

We're holding off because my daughter will be planning an addition, and obviously we'll want to engineer that into the water issue.

She's a SOG, and to date has had no water intrusion.... but boy it comes close in the heavy Dec/Jan rains.

Good luck.... I'll be watching your thread for anyideas/insights.

Best

Peter
 

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I have to fix my neighbor's house. His grade is nearly 12" above his siding. He also has a french drain that was not installed to address this issue but to help other low lying areas in the yard.

It's a 12' section of the home. The area of the home is an addition with a slab foundation. We are going to dig down to the drain tile and then out 4-6'. We will then treat it like a giant window well and attach to the drain tile and then filling with drainage material. We haven't decided what we will finish it with, but I think that it will be rock. It also hasn't been decided how we will handle the step down from the yard, but possibly a retaining wall or just grade the yard down to the gravel bed.

Just amazes me the number of contractors who would think that this is acceptable. But I guess when lowest bid wins, this is the result.
 

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Does anyone have any suggestions or methods for raising the grade of a lawn along vinyl siding? I figure we'd need to raise the siding and flash it somehow, but wondered if anyone has any proven methods to avoid rotted framing. We need to build the grade up approximately 8" along both of these walls. (On a side note, why can't builders simply build houses 12" higher! :wallbash: )

https://dyp.im/ad4A2yGAzo

https://dyp.im/SdDRviGX3p
Can you install a dry-well away from the house on the property and tie in all the gutters into it? You can also make a perimeter drain tied into the same well. It will cost a more, but it will be done the right way and at the same time it will save a whole lot more then that in the future on the repairs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Can you install a dry-well away from the house on the property and tie in all the gutters into it?
That's a good thought, but I'd want to have a soils engineer test the drainage characteristics of the soil in the area. We just redid a job where the previous contractor build a nice large "dry"-well in clay. :p

oldfrt....thanks for pointing out issue of dampness in the wall. I should have thought of that. That would be a disaster. I still am prone think there *must* be a way, but perhaps it's just wishful thinking.
 

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That's a good thought, but I'd want to have a soils engineer test the drainage characteristics of the soil in the area. We just redid a job where the previous contractor build a nice large "dry"-well in clay. :p

oldfrt....thanks for pointing out issue of dampness in the wall. I should have thought of that. That would be a disaster. I still am prone think there *must* be a way, but perhaps it's just wishful thinking.
You have to do percolation test if you doing a dry-well to determine the water absorption rate of the soil. If the soil type prevents from having a dry-well, you can also install a storage tank with a water release cap for spillover. Just have to make sure the spillover will use existing swale of adjoining properties, without flooding surrounding neighbors.
 

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EstimatorKev said:
Does anyone have any suggestions or methods for raising the grade of a lawn along vinyl siding? I figure we'd need to raise the siding and flash it somehow, but wondered if anyone has any proven methods to avoid rotted framing. We need to build the grade up approximately 8" along both of these walls. (On a side note, why can't builders simply build houses 12" higher! :wallbash: ) https://dyp.im/ad4A2yGAzo https://dyp.im/SdDRviGX3p
Water does not flow up hill, I think your concept warrants investigating. Treating the foundation and portions of the framing as a wood foundation, strip away the top soil, build up the rough grade and waterproof accordantly.
 
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