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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
An upper midwest outfit called Superior Wood Products makes them for 2x4 and 2x6 wall framing. I spent some time in NE Indiana, where I never saw a crew that was not Amish, and these things got used in just about every opening.

While the crews there are not buying and paying for the lumber they use for framing, the builders there pretty much let them order the whole package. Thus they would order these, with a higher cost versus sawn lumber.

I guess they saw them as a labor-saver. Used on a job they did for me, these things got used, and the whole-house-lot got whacked with a
chainsaw as soon as the deck was snapped out.

Don't know about the 2x4 size, but that 2x6 size has 3" of rigid EPS foam in its core.
 

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Pro
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Used on a job they did for me, these things got used, and the whole-house-lot got whacked with a
chainsaw as soon as the deck was snapped out.
what's that supposed to mean?

headers look neat, i saw some scabs use tji drops for headers here too. i'd probably avoid using them on larger openings or under point loads.
 

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Jeff
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We cant frame anything 2x4 because of code. Alot of guys around here just build a U header on 2x6 walls. 2x6 on the bottom then stand whatever header size your using, one inside, one outside leaving 2.5 inches in the center of it to insulate. Im sure its probably not right but i see a ton of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Clem, I'll say it terms you can understand better.

The snap-out told the crew boss, the one with the straightcut beard and the straw hat, what all the opening sizes would be in exterior walls on all floors. They wait until then because they believe the lines on the floor more than the plans. A list gets made and scribbled on a piece of scrap.

Then Amos Jr. (half of them that worked for me were named Amos or Johah) set up his chainsaw and homemade box-guide, and precision-cuts the header order, right off the stack of header lineals. The chainsaw blade has chunks of thick UHMW plastic bolted to the bar, to act as a fence-follower.

Every exterior opening gets one of these. No 2x6s at the tops or bottoms, because the depth is just right for what they want to do, which for the common precut-8 walls, is to frame RO heights at 82-7/8". Seems a little sloppy, but they like it that way.

Typical scope of work for an Amish framing crew all over NE IN is all frame from foundation up, installation of all exterior windows and doors, all roofing, fascia, drip. Every job has at least one telehandler on it from day one, and they insist on using the Lulls, etc., for unloading the lumber trucks, saying the boomers take too long, and don't put the stuff exactly where they want.

The telehandlers all have manlift platforms, so that much of the high work when appropriate gets done off a platform, without doing scaffolding or ladders.

Another couple things worth noting, were that they break out and almost always work singly, and all keep a skilsaw right close by, preferring cutting in place, rather than carrying something to a chopsaw station.
 

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Clem, I'll say it terms you can understand better.

The snap-out told the crew boss, the one with the straightcut beard and the straw hat, what all the opening sizes would be in exterior walls on all floors. They wait until then because they believe the lines on the floor more than the plans. A list gets made and scribbled on a piece of scrap.

Then Amos Jr. (half of them that worked for me were named Amos or Johah) set up his chainsaw and homemade box-guide, and precision-cuts the header order, right off the stack of header lineals. The chainsaw blade has chunks of thick UHMW plastic bolted to the bar, to act as a fence-follower.

Every exterior opening gets one of these. No 2x6s at the tops or bottoms, because the depth is just right for what they want to do, which for the common precut-8 walls, is to frame RO heights at 82-7/8". Seems a little sloppy, but they like it that way.

Typical scope of work for an Amish framing crew all over NE IN is all frame from foundation up, installation of all exterior windows and doors, all roofing, fascia, drip. Every job has at least one telehandler on it from day one, and they insist on using the Lulls, etc., for unloading the lumber trucks, saying the boomers take too long, and don't put the stuff exactly where they want.

The telehandlers all have manlift platforms, so that much of the high work when appropriate gets done off a platform, without doing scaffolding or ladders.

Another couple things worth noting, were that they break out and almost always work singly, and all keep a skilsaw right close by, preferring cutting in place, rather than carrying something to a chopsaw station.

oooh!:clap: sounds a lot like what we do, minus the lulls. our typical header is a 2x10 with a bottom cat to bring it out for rock, and give us 83-1/4" off the sub rough opening. works out good for interior 6'-8" doors set on 3/4 finish floor, and the windows heads work out to a 6'-11" andersen slider.

i don't pre-cut the house for headers either. too much shoving around in a tight place with all the headers. nice to know i'm two step behind the amish :blink:
 

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If its a triple header I'll put in 1" rigid insulation between one of the plys, nail thru with 4" spikes.

If its a double header I usually build the wall like Clem said,

"bottom cat to bring it out for rock, and give us 83-1/4" off the sub rough opening. works out good for interior 6'-8" doors set on 3/4 finish floor"

(still learning how to quote :rolleyes:)
 

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Wait till you here this one. I pre-cut my studs to length pick out the best ones to use as jacks gang all my jacks together clamp and cut a notch at 81 1/2 " 1 1/2" in from each side 9 1/4 down from the top.

This allows a 2x10 to be applied on the exterior and interior side . I pre build all my rough openings and nail them to the plates and shoes on the deck first than add leads, corners ,and common studs last.

Insulation is added in the cavity between the 2x10s just before the window is installed and structure is fully dried in. My corners and leads are also insulated.

The 2x10 might be over kill sometimes but it eliminates cripples as it goes all the way to top plate
 
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