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Discussion Starter #1
I am new in the business and would greatly appreciate all opinions regarding quote formats.

1. Do you think it is more effective to visit the customer and then email a typed quotation or give them with a hand written quote form presented in a glossy folder with references, insurance info, etc...

2. Can anyone send me examples of quote forms that they use for on the spot quotations?

Thank you,

Pete
 

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Not only what prowall said, but, if you email later, you miss the "strike when the Irons hot" close. I'll bet that looses alot in the closeing % area.


Bob
 

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I prefer to give them a quote on the spot. I'm continually refining my systems to allow me to get more and more precise and allow for more and more details to be defined.

The down side is my handwriting is horrible. But I have been following up after the meeting with a thank you letter and a computer version of the quote sent out the next day. I don't know if it is going to get me any jobs, but I have been told by people who didn't hire me how professional they thought I was and thanked me even though the job went to somebody else :rolleyes:

Ideally I would like a tiny laptop that boots up fast and a tiny printer that I could do the whole thing on at the kitchen table. That might be coming. It would certainly open up greatly the ability to store samples of bathroom fixtures, and pictures of things you are trying to explain to them.
 

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Holy crap, I just looked at your question again. I thought you meant come back later with the quote because you needed time to figure it out.

I would never email a quote to a customer - well, not never, if he was a friend or a repeat customer that would be different.

The very least thing you should know about sales is never make it easy on your customer to say no to you. Emailing a quote is just about the easiest way to let a customer off the hook. Don't ever do that.

If you can't quote on the spot, at the very least make another appointment to go over the numbers at a later date.

I have had customers who call me and then try to set up appointments when they won't even be there! They tell me that their kids will be there and can let me in or something, no freaken way, what a waste of time that would turn out to be.

I refuse to do stuff like that, face to face or I won't even bother setting the appointment. In fact I want the husband and wife present at the same time.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank You!

Thanks to ALL for answering my question. I've heard you loud and clear. I have small lap top and will purchase a portable printer this weekend. Quotes will done on the spot!

All our best and Happy New Year!

Pete & Kim :)
 

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Hey CALL, to add to Mikes and my advice, (you might already know this) but don't ever talk money on the phone either, look in the eye when you say $.

Bob
 

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If the bid is a standard length bid, we will figure them in our truck with a laptop and a Cannon I-80 portable printer. If the bid is lengthy, we will set an appointment for a day or so after the first meeting. Always return calls and be courteous. Take off shoes when entering houses- no matter what. Listen to what they want and not you telling them what they need. These common practices will set you apart from the rest. Our interior estimates for a single room can be as long as 9 pages. There is barely room for any lawsuits this way ;) We close about 50% of our leads and our prices are not cheap. We use a combo of Timerline Estimates and PEP from the PDCA. Both are excellent.
Good luck and remember not to pressure sale anyone, that leaves a really bad taste in everyones mouth- even yours!!
 

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I am a small startup on a shoestring budget, so I don't yet have the laptop, or printer. But I would never dream of leaveing the site to come back with the estimate.

I have a standard formula that I go by for estimating. I measure wall space LxWxH to get my sq ft. I then charge .75 per sq for a simple job. Simple job=2 coats on walls, 2 on trim, no extraordinary prep.

To remove wall paper the price jumps to 2.00 per sq as you never know if the sheetrock has been primered behind the wall paper, and there is sure to be quite a bit of sheetrock repair before paint.

Stainwork I calculate sq ft x hours....I figure there are four steps to staining. Clean new woodwork,stain,seal,sand & putty,urethene. I figure 5sq ft per hour total x $35. Plus matierials.

Once I have all the numbers I excuse myself to the van, and write the proposal on a standard 3 copie proposal pad. I go into great detail and write VERY clearly on all proposals. I then stamp the proposals with my info .

I do want the software, but Im far from that point right now.

I have 20 years experiance in painting, and have done small jobs for folks during that time. But have just recently gone off on my own. I know most of you guys have much more experiance in the estimating side of things, so if any of these numbers seemed a bit skewed I would greatlt appreciate your input on estimating.

Don
 

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donb1959 said:
I measure wall space LxWxH to get my sq ft.
?? That's the solution for cubic feet - not square feet. What Am I missing?
 

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In general when people on this site are quoting how much money they charge
per sq.ft of wall/ceiling area. Are people quoting the total area of the walls and ceilings and not removing how much area windows and doorways occupy? And if they don't, does trim, baseboards, and doors - get lumped into this $$/sq.ft format? Usually I quote windows, doors, trim, baseboards as a seperate items. And then calculate the wall + ceiling area. The only thing I can't figure out is, should I remove the area that windows, doors, and trim occupy in the wall space calculation. Or as I have been thinking recently, that the trouble and time it takes to cut and roll around such obstacles - it would be easer if it was just plain wall space that I was rolling out - so why not just calculate the gross area and quote that for wall painting. What do other people think?

-PlainPainter

P.S. I was helping a friend on a job, and so I was cutting out the living room, btw - we do trim first then walls. Anyways this living room was about 14' x 18', it had 3 doorways {front door, stairway, and dining room} One Fireplace, and five windows, and of course baseboards. I timed myself how long it would take to cut in the whole room's wall color. Well it was a deep brown and the cuts had to be perfect. It took me 1 - 3/4 hrs. to do it, and I boogied! and probably 1-1/4 to roll out with a 9" roller. If I had told my friend it would take 3 hrs. to cut and roll one coat on this room - he would have been like, no no no no - that's waaaaayy too long. Yet when I have timed him, he has yet to be as fast as me! So I think lot's of us are really underestimating how much it takes to get a job done. If you figure an hour per window for 2 coats, same with the fireplace, an hour to two coat the closet door, and another 2 hours to double coat all baseboards and other trim.
That's 15 hours total to get a room done - not including priming nor sanding.
at $40/hr including materials - that's already $600. Throw let's say another 6 hours for sanding, priming, tarping, painting the ceiling. Now you are up to $840. Or $1.01 per sq.ft. of total combined gross area of walls and ceilings. And this is new construction! This is a jobe where everything went well as planned. What do you do when things don't go well?
 

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LxWxH x

Originally Posted by donb1959
I measure wall space LxWxH to get my sq ft.


PipeGuy said:
?? That's the solution for cubic feet - not square feet. What Am I missing?
I understand that LxW gets you the sq ft....I actually stated the wrong term I meant cubic ft. This is why: I have been doing jobs per sq ft. I went to a job to price last week (900 sq ft). The great room is huge (24 ft cielings). I started thinking about it, and I figured if I want to get paid for painting the walls, then it would be best that I measure ALL the wall space not just the LxW. So I started measureing the height of the wall as well. Does that make sense to everyone, or am I missing something? :D

PS
I measure the Lx2 Wx2 Hx4 Cause there is 2 walls at that length 2 walls at that width and 4 walls at that Length.
 

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I measure the Lx2 Wx2 Hx4 Cause there is 2 walls at that length 2 walls at that width and 4 walls at that Length.[/QUOTE]
Makes perfect sense, LxW is the sq ft measurement of the ceiling and floor. Figure out walls space by height as well. We do subtract for all openings as well. This will not only give you wall sq footage, but how much material is needed to complete the project
 
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