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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All -

Tried a search but couldn't find anything specific. Real curious how the pros and seasoned veterans handle the following scenario:

Say your client orders solid masonite (or otherwise) prehung doors where the jamb is the standard 4 9/16. When you arrive onsite, the house is plaster and lath making the jambs much wider than the opening.

Do you:

  1. Place the Jamb in the opening, scribe the cut line, disassemble and run through table saw? Then reassemble?
  2. Place door in opening, cut strike jamb or hinge side jamb to make header level, screw top hinge side and then put in guides and cut around the door with a circ saw as close to finished wall?
  3. Attach 1x spreaders to the jamb and somehow run the entire jamb through a table saw awkwardly ?

Took more time than I'd like to admit getting this prehung door cut right and hung (actually the bottom is still binding against the hinge jamb a bit) Just looking for a quicker way since I have two more to do.



Thanks,

Harry
 

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Usually with lath and plaster the wall thickness winds up greater than 4 9/16"s, so I'm a little confused how your jambs are too big and need to be cut.. But if this were the case, I'd probably disassemble the jamb,run through a table saw and then reassemble.
 

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I would probably pop it apart and run it through the table saw. If you get the chance next time, order them from a door shop the right size.

Of course, I can't say much. I installed a used exterior door I had in my house and just let the jambs run wild. I'll invent some kind of impressive solution in the next 6 months or so, or at least before it starts raining. :laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Seasoned vets don't let the h/o order the doors.

But when I cut jambs down I use a track saw and leave it together
I hear you man. I was a bit surprised too but when I needed to pry those staples off from the jamb connection that's when I wondered there had to be a better way. That was a PITA. I'm thinking next time I'll try and cut them off using a Dremel with a flush cut blade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Usually with lath and plaster the wall thickness winds up greater than 4 9/16"s, so I'm a little confused how your jambs are too big and need to be cut.. But if this were the case, I'd probably disassemble the jamb,run through a table saw and then reassemble.
What I noticed was the original lumber was placed on it's side such that I'm getting 1.5" (close to it) for the jamb. The face of the 2x4 is facing the hall. I'm sure there is a reason they did it this way back then, but that explains why both sides were way smaller than the 4 9/16.
 

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I just installed two of those same doors. I picked them up at Diamond Lumber in S. Jersey. Nice heavy door.

I have had to cut several of those doors because a lot of homes in Philly are framed with 2x3's. So, you have the option of custom ordering a door with a smaller jam, or buy stock and cut.

I removed the door from the jam leaving the jam in tact and just cut the jam with my circular saw and a guide. Then, I'd clean up the cut with my block plane or sander if needed.

Never a problem, added maybe an hour to the whole job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I just installed two of those same doors. I picked them up at Diamond Lumber in S. Jersey. Nice heavy door.

I have had to cut several of those doors because a lot of homes in Philly are framed with 2x3's. So, you have the option of custom ordering a door with a smaller jam, or buy stock and cut.

I removed the door from the jam leaving the jam in tact and just cut the jam with my circular saw and a guide. Then, I'd clean up the cut with my block plane or sander if needed.

Never a problem, added maybe an hour to the whole job.
Lugging up the door up 3 flights of stairs really put me to the test..lol. I think it's heavy. And had to wonder about the guys who install these doors without taking the door off. I suppose it can be done, I'm not that quick (good) yet.

I assume you're cutting from inside the door way facing the finished side of the jamb. How are you locating and guiding the cut up the finished wall? Let's say the finished wall isn't perfectly square riding up the jamb?
 

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No. I cut the door jam prior to installation.

You can cut the jam with - or without - the door attached to the jam.

I use the guide that slides into the saw and just let it ride against the jam, go slow, sharp blade and make sure the guide stays against the jam.

I cut the jams square. I don't compensate for wavy walls by making the jams wavy. I'd do something else. I'd have to see the particular situation.

All that being said, this is not for high end, million dollar homes. For those situations, I may disassemble the jam completely and run each jam through the table saw and reassemble. For customers with smaller budgets, I can achieve very good results using my circular saw.

I also have a Makita power planer that is great at reducing the width of the jam if the amount is minimal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
No. I cut the door jam prior to installation.

You can cut the jam with - or without - the door attached to the jam.

I use the guide that slides into the saw and just let it ride against the jam, go slow, sharp blade and make sure the guide stays against the jam.

I cut the jams square. I don't compensate for wavy walls by making the jams wavy. I'd do something else. I'd have to see the particular situation.

All that being said, this is not for high end, million dollar homes. For those situations, I may disassemble the jam completely and run each jam through the table saw and reassemble. For customers with smaller budgets, I can achieve very good results using my circular saw.

I also have a Makita power planer that is great at reducing the width of the jam if the amount is minimal.
I ended up disassembling the jam and running it through the table saw. It was a major PITA getting those staples off, but it made it easier for me to run it through the table saw. I put it back together with some itebond and 4 2 1/2 16ga nails. I lined up the jamb, scribed a line flush with the wall and did my best to line up with that line, being a little proud. It came out ok, not perfect. When I throw up casing, I know i'm going to need to shim out certain areas to make the miters meet nicely.
 

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My brother like the jams to be a little proud. I'm not a fan.

I prefer my casing to sit flush with the wall and jam.

Can you correct the imperfections before attaching casing?

Send a picture.
 

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jb4211 said:
My brother like the jams to be a little proud. I'm not a fan.

I prefer my casing to sit flush with the wall and jam.

Can you correct the imperfections before attaching casing?

Send a picture.
I'd rather have it sit a little ( 1/32"-1/16") proud on a plaster wall, than to start bashing it back under the casing and have a big lump of plaster jump off the lath.
 

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jb4211 said:
Yes. That's not much at all
True,
But it's still proud.

( Sorry, I've been know to pick fly chit out of pepper, when it comes to doors and trim. )


On drywall I'll go flush, leaning towards shy.
 

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You could always throw it in the hole and use a jamb saw.

Routing it off takes too long, but you can do it as well.
 

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hdavis said:
You could always throw it in the hole and use a jamb saw.

Routing it off takes too long, but you can do it as well.
If you're taking off more than 1/4 " at a time, it also puts waves in your jamb that would not follow the contour of a "flat" door, on the hinge side anyway...

Wait, how did this become a door clinic based on a homeowner "miss-ordering" the doors.

...that's right, it's CT.

Anyways, to the OP;

1) Don't let your customer order your material.
(I think there is another thread in this forum that speaks to this about the folding of toilet paper)

2) You got a little bit to learn yet about hanging doors.
 
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