Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,223 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i have a costumer wanting flagstone or something on her back patio.i have been given conflicting amounts needed by two different yards.for 500 sq ft one is saying 12 ton,the other is saying 7 ton.both 2 inch material.which is closer?also,i dont get alot of call for this type material,so how is best way to install it?its going over an exisiting slab.so i figured a cement base,and grouted in.
any help would be great.thanks guys.:thumbup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
I usually cut a section first and lay it the next day. I like to lay in the morning and cut during the heat. I use a common mix with a cup or so of glue. If I'm in a good mood I might hit the back of the stone with some thinset, but just wetting it works. Keep them flat as you lay them. Tipping in place will leave voids. If your joints crack it's usually from a wobbly stone. Also tuck point around the edges real good while the bed is fresh. After it sets, before grout, touch up the joints with a mikita to even them up a bit and to round of any corners that may look unnaturally square. I use a 30/60 silica sand for grout, sponging them off.
Most of the flag I see is terrible for paving. It doesn't hold up to water and wears horribly. I push quartzite. 1"-. Any thicker and it kills blades. Plenty strong. I figure 100' sq. to a ton. The same with the flag. Often the 1" has nicer and bigger pieces as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
At 2" you will need no more than 7 tons. Like tkle I estimate about 100 sq. ft. per ton at that thickness. Stone should be set on a concrete slab. I use type s mortar for bedding and joints.
My method is I will layout a few stones first than mortar them in. I have found that if you layout or "dry lay" too many and then you start mortaring the stones it may not work out. If you are a little off on each one it starts to add up and the allignment starts to get way off.

I like to butter the backs of the stone making sure the stones are clean. Don't like just wetting the backs because I feel that might keep the mortar from sticking when setting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
One step at a time will give faster production plus you don't have mud or a dirty mixer sitting all day while you cut. Dry cut, then pick up one stone at a time when you lay them. They will lay out slightly different. You won't get them sitting perfectly the same way you cut them, just keep a decent joint and a makita easily and quickly corrects this before grout. If you cut and set you will find yourself wanting to cut the last stones you laid. You're always starting again. You keep that to a minimum by taking it in steps.
Wetting, not saturating. the back helps bond. Type s grout is hard to sponge. The lime is not needed. A coffee can works better than a grout bag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
I use portland for grout, but I am real picky of the brand. Some are dark and dirty looking.
After laying each stone I pack in the leading edge and tuck in the joints around it, leaving them recessed about 3/8ths". Using silica for grout it plugs your bag. I simply kink a 1 lb. coffee can to form a spout and pour the grout in the joint. A little goes a long ways.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
When sponging the joints, don't buy expensive rubber gloves. They're too stiff to start with. The cheaper orange ones are better yet they are still too stiff and they make your hands stink as well. Just buy the cheap $1.98 womens dishwashing gloves at the grocery store. They come in extra large, are nimble and hold up. The pink ones are the best.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top