Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
477 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
build decks for a living....:no:

My house is an off grade build. It is basically poured blocks with 2x12's stretched from N to S. They are "stacked" with 4 in the middle, then 3 then 2 on the outside.

So originally when I bought this house it had engineered beams that stretched out of the walls and cantilevered porches on it. Stupid idea where I live and eventually I had to cut them off because of rot.

Any way, my question is this, I need/want to start looking into rebuilding my upstairs decks since they are just temp supported and I was wondering what you guys would think about attaching 6x6 posts to the beams under the house instead of pouring new footers (pain because of the existing pours for the block) and using simpson ties to tie them in.

Just running ideas...... I am attaching a picture of the underneath of my dirty house......
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,076 Posts
Are you saying that there was once a second-story deck above that awning, and that the thing we see sticking out of the wall next to the awning was a cantilevered beam, supporting that deck? And that you want to put a ledger above that awning, and on the outboard end of the deck, have some posts that will be standing on top of beams like the one in the first picture? Or maybe something like that in the back of the house, where the deck is on temp supports?
 

·
John Hyatt
Joined
·
3,658 Posts
It was common in Oregon back in the day to extend the Doug fir floor joists out to provide an upstairs deck. Keep in Mind I was working by the hour then.

Ghesssss I hate to think about that now but everyone was doing it.

Landing a support post for an upstairs on the framing of the downstairs deck would work as long as dead bearing was provided and a real strong connection was made like the 1/4'' steel U brackets I have made up by my local hot rod welder.

I have done this before building a free standing shade room where the framing down below was too dense for another pier but never for an upstairs deck...so maybe I should say it might work.

JonMon www.deckmastersllc.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
477 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Are you saying that there was once a second-story deck above that awning, and that the thing we see sticking out of the wall next to the awning was a cantilevered beam, supporting that deck? And that you want to put a ledger above that awning, and on the outboard end of the deck, have some posts that will be standing on top of beams like the one in the first picture? Or maybe something like that in the back of the house, where the deck is on temp supports?
Yes.

There was a deck were the awning is (cantilevered on beams that as you see are cut off). The awning was put up there after I had to cut the deck down, to help cover the door.

I want to put a ledger board up and place posts on the beams under the first floor porch.

I am trying not to have to put posts all the way to the ground.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
477 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have thought about using custom connectors, but haven't gotten that far yet.

Really just evaluating and exploring my options.

The first floor beams are slightly cantilevered over the block supports so I have to take that in consideration to for load variances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,377 Posts
At least you don't have a snow load to calculate.

You refer to it as a deck. Are you changing the window to a door? If not it's just a flat roof. What size structure are you building?



Tom
 

·
GC/carpenter
Joined
·
43,893 Posts
TLHWindows said:
Yes. There was a deck were the awning is (cantilevered on beams that as you see are cut off). The awning was put up there after I had to cut the deck down, to help cover the door. I want to put a ledger board up and place posts on the beams under the first floor porch. I am trying not to have to put posts all the way to the ground.
It would be nice to get full bearing on your posts all the way to the footing. But I don't see a problem as long as you have proper lateral bracing. However it's a concern I deal with a lot because of seismic, but everyone has lateral concerns due to other natural occurrences. Lateral bracing could be as simple as knee bracing from post to beam. Attaching your second floor posts on the first floor beam may create a scissors point. Hence the reason I'm thinking lateral bracing may be the solution.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top