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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I stopped by to pick something up from a friend this afternoon where he was trimming a house. I was hassling him about the hammer he uses, but it got me to thinking. I've used the same 16 oz cheapo from the bulk bins for years for any trim work I've done. I don't do near as much as I used to, but still some every know and again. My buddy uses a little 10 oz job. I can see where it would be nice when it's hanging from a tool belt, but it just doesn't feel right to me swinging it.

That brings me to my question, what do you use? I was going to post this in the tools section, but I want to hear from the finish carpenters and folks who do trim day in and day out.
 

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20oz wooden handled Vaughn
I like a wooden handle over steel. Less shock less weight.
 

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16 oz straight claw steel handle Estwing
12 oz straight claw wood handle Hart

I also am very partial to the Titanium hammers.
Use the 14 oz Stiletto religiously.
Just got a 10 Stiletto that I think will see full time use.

:thumbsup::clap:
 

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I had a 16 oz Vaughn hammer that I had been using for at least 10 years until I was installing a door one day and someone walked off with it. Since then I'm just using a 16 oz Stanley.
 

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Stanley 16 and 20 oz. Mostly the 16 oz. Just to set nails though. If I have to hit anything it is with a rubber mallet. Other than that do you really need a hammer for trim work?
I have been meaning to buy the Vaughn hammer with the rubber and composite. I probably will once I get to the hardware store.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Kind of an odd question, but thought I'd ask it just for something a little different. I figured the answers would be far and wide.

I guess I just don't really understand how the physics of the titanium hammers work. I've always used a 23 oz Vaughan for framing. It's balanced perfect and hits hard. But everyone says the titanium hammers are light, but hit equally as hard. Just doesn't seem right to me.

I sure like the idea of carrying around a lightweight hammer, but the 10 oz that I've seen all feel too light. They feel like you would have to take a really hard swing to do any good. I'm just not going to do that in a trim situation. Of course these are all steel hammers that I've seen.

Hammers are a strange tool to me. It seems every trade has a special hammer. They are all basically hammers, but they are all designed to do something different. But that's a whole other topic. I seem to be getting myself off track and rambling. I better quit for now. :laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
After seeing the prices on the Stiletto website, I'm no longer interested in learning about titanium hammers. I figure if I don't understand them, I'll be less inclined to want one.

Ok, that may not be entirely true. I'm still curious about them, but dadgum those things are high.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
One more

Do you prefer a straght or curved claw? And why?

I've always preferred straight because I can fit it into tighter places for prying.
 

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16 oz Estwing with the leather handle
I used to use the leather handles estwing for trim also, but switched to the rubber handle to keep from marring up finish work. Also the handle works better for the gentle "nudge" I also give up the regular steel hoop hammer holder when working in kitchens and baths. I hate it when I turn quicker than the hammer and hear the bang of the hammer bouncing off a cabinet or counter top.

Stanley 16 and 20 oz. Mostly the 16 oz. Just to set nails though. If I have to hit anything it is with a rubber mallet. Other than that do you really need a hammer for trim work?
I have been meaning to buy the Vaughn hammer with the rubber and composite. I probably will once I get to the hardware store.
I've been using a rubber coated dead blow hammer that works well when something needs a little more than a gentle "nudge":laughing:
 
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