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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Morning everyone-
As some of you already know I recently got my GC license and have been learning much of the business side of things on the fly. My question is; I'm getting ready to start a small job and will need an electrician to do a part of it. I have general liability coverage but no workers comp yet. Do I need workers comp if I subcontract with another licensed & insured contractor or only if I hire a non-licensed electrician and he works as my employee as part of my own crew??? I know I studied this stuff fairly recently but things have a habit of fading from memory when I don't tap into them frequently. Thanks...
 

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Concrete Mike
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Morning everyone-
As some of you already know I recently got my GC license and have been learning much of the business side of things on the fly. My question is; I'm getting ready to start a small job and will need an electrician to do a part of it. I have general liability coverage but no workers comp yet. Do I need workers comp if I subcontract with another licensed & insured contractor or only if I hire a non-licensed electrician and he works as my employee as part of my own crew??? I know I studied this stuff fairly recently but things have a habit of fading from memory when I don't tap into them frequently. Thanks...
In ohio you need workers comp when u pull a permit as a contractor, if the electrician pulls the permit then no, as long as he is registerd with that city, but again that is in ohio.
 

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If you have employees you are required to have workers comp. (there is an exception if you have enough money). If you have no employees there is no need or requirement (in CA) to have it.

Good Luck!
 

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If you hire a licensed sub-contractor you will not need comp. If your sub has employees he will need comp on them. As the General if your sub has employees and no comp it will fall on you. Don't get caught in the trap of hiring an employee and caaling him a "sub" to avoid comp, taxes etc. This will get very expensive when you get caught.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you hire a licensed sub-contractor you will not need comp. If your sub has employees he will need comp on them. As the General if your sub has employees and no comp it will fall on you. Don't get caught in the trap of hiring an employee and caaling him a "sub" to avoid comp, taxes etc. This will get very expensive when you get caught.
This guy is licensed and is a one man show (no employees). He'll be doing the actual work himself. The job is something I could probably do myself but I'd rather watch and learn than scratch my head and just wing it, especially since it's on a large multi-story residential building. :thumbsup: Thanks Griz...
 

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Motorboatin' son of a ...
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You only need workers comp if you have employees. If you hire a sub, they need to have comp for their employees. If he's just a one man show, he doesn't need comp. Ask if he will have employees on the job. If he says yes, then ask for proof of workers comp. If he doesn't have it and has employees, then you are responsible. If you hire the guy as an employee, then you will need to get workers comp, and do payroll. If the guy has his own license, then use him as a sub and 1099 him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You only need workers comp if you have employees. If you hire a sub, they need to have comp for their employees. If he's just a one man show, he doesn't need comp. Ask if he will have employees on the job. If he says yes, then ask for proof of workers comp. If he doesn't have it and has employees, then you are responsible. If you hire the guy as an employee, then you will need to get workers comp, and do payroll. If the guy has his own license, then use him as a sub and 1099 him.
This looks like what I'm gonna do, thanks BK.
 

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Make sure the guy is a C-10 Electrical contractor and not just a certified electrician. Also you can not hire him as a employee, as certified electricians can only work for C-10 Electrical contractors.
 
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