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RE: Copper for fences posts

They are actually cheaper in the stores. I tried 12 gauge copper a couple times and both times the resins in the Redwood we use in Ca ate through the copper. Then the same happened on a 10 gauge sheet a customer had, it also failed. Whats cool about the collars is the inside is a thick pliable mastic type material that hardens around the post after a hot few days. Thats what keeps the galvanized exterior from contact with resins or chemicals in pt that eat up galvy or copper. But yeah copper would work well if it had a buffer and went below grade a few inches. Copper doesnt like concrete remember( as a contractor) thats why we have to insulate or sleeve copper pipes in slabs- concrete eats copper.

Its the best product we have found it also bullet proofs a fence post from weed wackers! The nail holes also self seal and kick boards can be used. In our county they are on all the sign posts, and I saw them in Lake Tahoe. So I guess the price depends on how often you want to replace a fence or mail box. What about $150 for a hundred lf 4x4s that will make it last...30 years or more? To me and our customers there not much to weigh out.
 

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Even ground contact doosent matter once The EPA banned CCA pt posts are garbage. Its not just ground contact but the important thing is "retention."
 

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Yeah it needs that membrane.Resins in wood or chemicals will eat galvanized up in no time.Its science guy reaction stuff.
 

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They are actually cheaper in the stores. I tried 12 gauge copper a couple times and both times the resins in the Redwood we use in Ca ate through the copper. Then the same happened on a 10 gauge sheet a customer had, it also failed. Whats cool about the collars is the inside is a thick pliable mastic type material that hardens around the post after a hot few days. Thats what keeps the galvanized exterior from contact with resins or chemicals in pt that eat up galvy or copper. But yeah copper would work well if it had a buffer and went below grade a few inches. Copper doesnt like concrete remember( as a contractor) thats why we have to insulate or sleeve copper pipes in slabs- concrete eats copper.

Its the best product we have found it also bullet proofs a fence post from weed wackers! The nail holes also self seal and kick boards can be used. In our county they are on all the sign posts, and I saw them in Lake Tahoe. So I guess the price depends on how often you want to replace a fence or mail box. What about $150 for a hundred lf 4x4s that will make it last...30 years or more? To me and our customers there not much to weigh out.
 

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John Hyatt
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The " Resins " in your " Kind " of Redwood ate through Copper.

Total Bogus.

I do Admire your dedication to Sales however.

Side Note >> nothing " self Seals " on an outdoor project <<

Again nice try.

J.
 

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What about Gracies- Henrys...lol...ok pal now you have lost my complete and total respect as an advise giver. There are dozens of products used from roofing to windows foundations that must self seal. mastics, butyls, bitumen membranes. By the way its not my product Pal! Use what you wish I can care less, but your condescending pedantic and obtuse replies are what women do on Facebook and have no value on a help forum.... Here is my Ca contractors license and a link. Can I see your plz? I see you spend your time giving your 1/
100th cents worth and I have read your uneducated and wrong advise, shall we have a pissing contest? I think maybe a knitting contest would be in your favor.. Why dont you go build something, like the 100ish homes and thousands of fences my companies have built. Have a wonderful life lonely man...or are you a man?.

https://www2.cslb.ca.gov/onlineservices/CheckLicenseII/LicenseDetail.aspx?LicNum=606100.
http://thepostcollar.com/main_page.html
 

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Can I see your credentials plz? Licenses projects etc. I mean professional projects and I just showed you facts. Your right to call me Miss because I cant believe Im in a sitting down piss'n contest. Over and out! God Bless America!
 

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I said 100 lf. Thats about 15 4x4 posts. If you want to be adamant about being able to wrap a pt, wood post in 21 gauge copper- like gutter material and have it last at ground contact, with our without concrete than have at it. If you can do that for 5 bucks show me where to buy plz. Maybe 16 gauge might last a few years. There is no doubt copper is great on roofs, gutters etc. They found houses with termites in the 60s that near the grounding rods the termites stayed away. So yes its being used widespread for gutters and roofs but is quite costly. So to answer your question it reads 100lf = linear feet.
 

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Thanks Buddy! I was drunk driving last night, I thought this was just another place people go to give advice they read somewhere else. But there are some good threads on here. I wish I could erase my posts, but...we live and learn, Im a dumass. This is an awesome site and I was reading contributions and you know what your doing. I saw your deck site as well. I have been building decks for years as well. Even lost my ass investing in a container of IPE, Cumaru and Tigerwood. The import taxes killed us. My hats off to you have a great life John Hyat! My apologies once again!
 

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Thanks for pointing that out, I missed it in your original post.

8" 3oz copper flashing is about $2 / ft here. The vast majority of fence posts around here don't need to have anything done to them, because the fence will need to be replaced at some point, and as long as the posts stand up that long, extra life doesn't do anything.

Redwood fencing is a little different. Where you are, you probably can get 50yrs with no rot in the panels. Redwood fence panels in swampy areas here (shaded) will last ~30 years. A redwood post in a swampy area probably wouldn't reliably make the 30 years of expected panel life.

Most of the panels I've seen get changed out for cosmetic reasons - the weather and sun damage adds up on anything that isn't painted. Getting the posts to last as long as the panels isn't a huge problem here. I can put a green, unpeeled white cedar post in, and get 20-30 years out of it uncoated, but cosmetically it won't look all that great after 10 years. The sun and drying cycles take their toll.
 

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Thanks Buddy! I was drunk driving last night, I thought this was just another place people go to give advice they read somewhere else. But there are some good threads on here. I wish I could erase my posts, but...we live and learn, Im a dumass. This is an awesome site and I was reading contributions and you know what your doing. I saw your deck site as well. I have been building decks for years as well. Even lost my ass investing in a container of IPE, Cumaru and Tigerwood. The import taxes killed us. My hats off to you have a great life John Hyat! My apologies once again!
Hyatt knows his stuff.:thumbsup:

Always better to drive drunk after people know you, there are guys that will post like that sober...
 

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John Hyatt
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Now I , have NEVER posted while I was drinking.

:drink:

Well hardly ever.

But drunk or sober I know for a Fact the copper wrap works / lasts. Rice Folks did it thousand or so years ago and I have done it around Redwood, Western red cedar , acq pt just about anything wood planted in the ground on a project where the Wallet was willing to pay for it. But really it's over kill when using Copper Green in correct measure.

Buying South American lumber sight unseen / unknown packer is a very bad idea x 100 when a container is involved. Best outfit for buying the stuff I have found > East Teak 800 338 5636 Ask for George < A Contractor needs at least one person in-between when getting SA for a lot of reasons.

JonMon www.deckmastersllc.com
 

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Its all about retention and spraying copper green has no retention. When a posts is pressure treated its exactly that. In the old days pt lumber was kd- kilned dried because the moisture made the posts twist when the water evaporated. After KD the posts roll through what like a huge muliti - toothed stapler without the staples that opens up the lumber with the holes you see. Then they are placed in what might look like a giant decompression chamber. Thats where the posts get impregnated with the chemicals used today because of the ban the Fenceguy quotes about CCA which contains arsenate which is now banned in resi applications. Retention is the psi= pounds per square inch of treatment. Thats what you see on the tags 15- 30 etc. The higher the retention the better for ground contact. Now days they dont kiln dry or air dry at the plants thats treat lumber prior to the pressure treatment- pressure treated.... Its called planned obsolescence. This is a fact. You and John both speak of Copper green, which also had CCA Chromated Copper Arsenate in in prior to 2004. Will not work zero retention. I just had to speak out again because you are giving bogus info to people looking for something that works. You, we can argue until the end of time I owned a treatment plant in the late 80s. Retention back then was .40 psi. or LP 40. Bullet proof posts. I still like you guys, but come on, I see you wrote creosote does nothing to kill bugs? It will kill a human and an elephant but that was a funny statement...I am sober. lol. I also have a re-saw yard. By the way the timbers from Brazil were beautiful! My broker was not aware of the Brazilian governments tax that hit early 16 because of a documentary made that put pressure on the gov at the time from our government and other countries. Copper green is good for mild rot, with a wood hardener then wood bondo under windows, or even eves but not to spray on a post thats going to have seasons ans seasons of exposure. Im interested in your argument on this one. Id like to see the posts wrapped in copper as well. Here is a Post Collar Fence not that that is even the question anymore. By Fella's.
 

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We could talk about this for a looong time.

Historical methods:

Copper cladding @ ground level for a few inches each way.

Charring green posts (surface creosote).

Building a fire in the post hole (treating the ground with creosote).

IMO, copper cladding really treats mostly the soil due to the copper corroding and washing down into the soil.

Creosote doesn't wash out easily, so whether the hole or pole is treated, it will last.

All other pressure treatments (or naturally decay resistant properties) of wood leach out eventually, it's just a question of how fast. The key part for insects and fungal attack (outside of termite territory) is pretty much the first 4-6 inches below the soil level, and a couple inches above. Anything you do to slow leaching in this area will improve post life. Above ground, wetting and drying can lead to deep cracks that accelerate the weathering and degradation of that portion.

Back to copper green. Spray or roll application pretty much just leaves a surface film, except for cut ends. It will wash off fairly quickly, but it's really treating the soil in contact with the wood. Above ground around here, there will still be noticeable amounts of copper green (the new stuff) after 3 years, but it's pretty much gone after 5. I couldn't tell you how much life it adds for sure on a buried post, but from what I've seen around here it's at least 5, and probably more.
 
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