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pro
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Guess it's just different parts of the country.... but a gable line parellell to slope is a rake out here.... more often used in roofing terminology.

But I've gotten confused here.... are you guys saying that your lookouts are toenailed to your end gable rafter... and are not let-in to your end gable rafter and the one next back.....?
Yes, we toenail em right to the gable end rafter, its been common practice around here since I was a "whipper snapper" that's what the ol timers I started with called me lol. Some guys I've seen build the ladders on horses and nail em on to the gables, but I always figured that was a waste of a couple sticks once I became the boss
 

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pro
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I only use the let in method when the gable overhang is greater than 12". Good blocking and plywood lapping makes a 12" plenty stiff without the extra time of letting in.
Same here to the let in method with larger overhangs, but the last 100 houses I have framed were match the rake overhang to the soffit, which has been 12" or less
 

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pro
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Guess it's just different parts of the country.... but a gable line parellell to slope is a rake out here.... more often used in roofing terminology.

But I've gotten confused here.... are you guys saying that your lookouts are toenailed to your end gable rafter... and are not let-in to your end gable rafter and the one next back.....?
That's it right there
 

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stacker of sticks
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I used to do them all as well. But experience has taught me that there is no sacrifice in quality not doing it for 12" and under. The time savings adds up on a large house.
I spent my first 6 or so years strictly roofing, and I could always tell. Does it matter? Probably not. But last year we had to cut a roof all apart, 12" over hangs because they dropped 2". It was toe nailed to the sheathing.

I was actually going to bring this up a few weeks ago, we did a roof and I could wiggle the overhang a good inch without effort.
 

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We tie them all in to the second rafter. I don't care if it's 6" or 2'.
Wow now i'm confused as well :)
you notch your gable rafter(bringing lookouts through ) and secure to the second rafter ?
If so
wouldn't that compromise the strength of the gable rafter ?
Most guys ive seen around here) build a ladder and shoot into the gable end, then roof sheathing starts at the overhang helping secure the overhang as well .
 

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I spent my first 6 or so years strictly roofing, and I could always tell. Does it matter? Probably not. But last year we had to cut a roof all apart, 12" over hangs because they dropped 2". It was toe nailed to the sheathing.

I was actually going to bring this up a few weeks ago, we did a roof and I could wiggle the overhang a good inch without effort.
IT is more than just toe nails.Proper blocking is essential. You also need to run the fascia back as far as possible. Making sure that it is set properly in the first place is also important.
 

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Wow now i'm confused as well :)
you notch your gable rafter(bringing lookouts through ) and secure to the second rafter ?
If so
wouldn't that compromise the strength of the gable rafter ?
Most guys ive seen around here) build a ladder and shoot into the gable end, then roof sheathing starts at the overhang helping secure the overhang as well .
Does not compromise the gable. A gable will be fully supported by the studs under it.
 

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stacker of sticks
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IT is more than just toe nails.Proper blocking is essential. You also need to run the fascia back as far as possible. Making sure that it is set properly in the first place is also important.
Yeah I know, it was a 70s ranch. Not a whole lot was done right. I was just trying to bring my personal experience to the thread, but it wasn't a good example because they didn't do it correct at all :laughing:
 

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pro
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Does not compromise the gable. A gable will be fully supported by the studs under it.
My thoughts are the same as yours Warren, studs support the gable end, just don't put a skinny rip of sheathing up there, its always a full sheet or half to catch that rake. Or close to a full or half depending on the layout. Speaking of layout, isn't that what this threads about!!??
 

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diplomat
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My thoughts are the same as yours Warren, studs support the gable end, just don't put a skinny rip of sheathing up there, its always a full sheet or half to catch that rake. Or close to a full or half depending on the layout. Speaking of layout, isn't that what this threads about!!??
I haven't framed hundreds of homes, but I've done a lot of experimenting and framed overhangs many different ways. I'd enjoy a thread dedicated to this detail. Anyone else?
 

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We run the rake back to the 2nd rafter/truss. The actual "gable" rafter is just blocking between the facia and 2nd rafter.

I've seen too many sagging rakes to do otherwise. Plywood will sag overtime so personally I wouldn't rely on it.
 

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Always Learning
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Warren said:
I only use the let in method when the gable overhang is greater than 12". Good blocking and plywood lapping makes a 12" plenty stiff without the extra time of letting in.
It's just habit for us. We always let in or order a drop down gable.
 

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I only use the let in method when the gable overhang is greater than 12". Good blocking and plywood lapping makes a 12" plenty stiff without the extra time of letting in.
Warren... Thanks.... thought I mis-understood.... probably my 62 snow lode

Best
 

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pro
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I used to always layout my rafters to compensate for the rakes, ie ya only have to cut a sheet on one side of the gable. Makes my job easier right? But Mr inspector gave me chit a couple years back cause the rafters weren't stacked on the studs. I mentioned to him theres a Dbl plate plate up there so what does it matter...he didn't like that excuse..now I just stack all rafters on the studs below, and start with a cut of sheathing and end with one..and of course NOW the rafters are stacked with studs, and joists for the sparkys, plumbers and whoever else is there.
 

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I used to always layout my rafters to compensate for the rakes, ie ya only have to cut a sheet on one side of the gable. Makes my job easier right? But Mr inspector gave me chit a couple years back cause the rafters weren't stacked on the studs. I mentioned to him theres a Dbl plate plate up there so what does it matter...he didn't like that excuse..now I just stack all rafters on the studs below, and start with a cut of sheathing and end with one..and of course NOW the rafters are stacked with studs, and joists for the sparkys, plumbers and whoever else is there.
So do you do a lot of conventional framing in western ma ?
or mostly trusses ?
 

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diplomat
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I used to always layout my rafters to compensate for the rakes, ie ya only have to cut a sheet on one side of the gable. Makes my job easier right? But Mr inspector gave me chit a couple years back cause the rafters weren't stacked on the studs. I mentioned to him theres a Dbl plate plate up there so what does it matter...he didn't like that excuse..now I just stack all rafters on the studs below, and start with a cut of sheathing and end with one..and of course now the rafters, studs, and joists all line up for the sparkys, plumbers and whoever else is there.
Stacked framing is good, but just show him the code book! even with a single 2x6 top plate it can be off alignment by 1". 5" for double 2x4. Anything double 2x6. This is Irc 2009 though. Not sure your local code.
 
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