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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just finished a 12x 16 shed for myself in the backyard.

My question is: I used coil roofing nails to attach the 11/32 pine panel siding (to the 1/2 OSB and/or 16" studs behind it)

Did I mess up by using this type of nail??
very often the nail did not even penetrate deep enough for the nail head to be flush with the panel. (I went back over when done with a framing hammer and drove the protruding nails in a best I could, but even then some nails are still "close to flush, yet protruding" (especially in those spots where I missed the stud, the hammer seems to help a lesser bit on those nails.)

What should I do this time? What should I do next time?
 

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I just finished a 12x 16 shed for myself in the backyard.

My question is: I used coil roofing nails to attach the 11/32 pine panel siding (to the 1/2 OSB and/or 16" studs behind it)

Did I mess up by using this type of nail??
very often the nail did not even penetrate deep enough for the nail head to be flush with the panel. (I went back over when done with a framing hammer and drove the protruding nails in a best I could, but even then some nails are still "close to flush, yet protruding" (especially in those spots where I missed the stud, the hammer seems to help a lesser bit on those nails.)

What should I do this time? What should I do next time?
What should I do this time?...Hire a Carpenter....:laughing:

What should I do next time?...Hire a Carpenter....:laughing:

Layout where the studs are prior to nailing off.

Do not use a roofing nailer.

Use a punch nails to drive flush.
 

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Roofing guns are not designed to set the nail----think about it---if that gun drove a nail below the surface---it would punch right through the shingle.


Just set them with a hammer-----Mike----
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Roofing guns are not designed to set the nail----think about it---if that gun drove a nail below the surface---it would punch right through the shingle.


Just set them with a hammer-----Mike----
yes, what is your opinion/idea of the perfect "set" of the nail :)

time to learn something :clap:
 

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Roofing nails can not be set below the surface of the wood---the head is to big--so flush is as good as it gets---that is why most folks would use a framing nailer for that type of work---the smaller heads will drive into the wood as deep as you set the stops.

A shed of your own is a good place to learn some carpentry skills.

If you wish to really pick up some proper skills---help out an old weathered looking carpenter---
 

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The Dude
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When you are installing fiber cement lap siding you CAN use a roofing gun for the concealed fasteners. Not sure if they require HDG for those, but I remember being surprised seeing it in the Hardi install guide. Might have to have hdg roofing nails.

I've been thinking about trying it since you are supposed to flush drive the nails. I have been using my Hitachi framer with 8d HDG ring shanks. It's easy enough to adjust to flush, but its not a true flush drive nailer like a roofing or siding gun.

EDIT: My framer is a full round head, not a clipped head gun. If I need more nails per load, I'll get the coil framer.
 

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When you are installing fiber cement lap siding you CAN use a roofing gun for the concealed fasteners. Not sure if they require HDG for those, but I remember being surprised seeing it in the Hardi install guide. Might have to have hdg roofing nails.

I've been thinking about trying it since you are supposed to flush drive the nails. I have been using my Hitachi framer with 8d HDG ring shanks. It's easy enough to adjust to flush, but its not a true flush drive nailer like a roofing or siding gun.
I actually tried it yesterday, and quickly took down the section I did it on, and ran to the store and picked up a siding nailer
 

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Personally I don't trust anything but stainless steel. All others are just coated what happens when that coating chips ect . But you def pay a lot more
 

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Hair Splitter
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Personally I don't trust anything but stainless steel. All others are just coated what happens when that coating chips ect . But you def pay a lot more
By the time anything happens, if anything happens, it's probably time for a new shed.
 

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The Dude
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Personally I don't trust anything but stainless steel. All others are just coated what happens when that coating chips ect . But you def pay a lot more
The zinc will migrate to fill minor voids somewhat - at least hot dip will, it's called self-healing. EG not so much. The coating doesn't chip off, it can be scratched and abraded, but it holds up pretty good particularly where EG is ok to use. Zinc also provides cathodic protection to prevent galvanic corrosion from contact with dissimilar metals. The zinc will corrode first if you have say copper and steel in contact. It's why boats prop shafts have a sacraficial anode - the zinc. The bushings are bronze, and if you don't have the zinc, you will eat bearings at a record rate since the metals are in electrical contact.

I do agree that stainless is better though, and it's also close on the galvanic corrosion scale to copper and considered safe to use with it. Technically if it's freshly cut, it's a little too far away, but it forms an oxide layer extremely quickly that is very close - so ss is listed twice on some corrosion charts.
 
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