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sodablaster dude
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi guys,
I got a problem with surface after sodablasting.

Log house walls was blasted inside. House is new, not fully finished.
Outside temperature while blasting was appr. 5oC and higher humidity.

Right now after month of that there are green stains on the walls... when you want to clean it with water it's getting even worse... a little better with warm water, but still green and effects similar to smearing atrament pen stains... you can imagine.

Is there any way to neutralize that? Tomorrow will get photos how it looks like.

Please help. Thank you.
 

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Trial and Error Opperator
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Chuck

What kind of wood is the logs?

Most around here are pine, cedar

Is it just little spots of green here and there or big spot

Is the spots that's green in a area on the wood say were there's a knot or crack in the wood

I'd take a guess and say maybe the soda is reacting to the pitch in the wood

If the logs were not dried properly after cutting by the mill than it will bleed pitch

I used to have problems when I was painting house with it, Polyurethane in the spots I mentioned would basically peel off, the pitch would basically punch it off

We need some pictures !!! To better understand
 

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although I advertise my business as a soda blasting business I have found soda is very limited to what you can do with it. I blast wood with 50-100 glass now. one issue with soda is every crack that has soda in it once stained is going to turn black.

I would reblast with glass. it will be quick and should make the customer happy.
 

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Trial and Error Opperator
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I agree
My business name has soda in it to
But now after a few years only makes up 5% of my business, I do way more sandblasting now

But soda has its place

Logs homes, I use the glass too
I found the soda doesn't work the way it's suppose to on wood, not having a hard surface to explode itself thus acting like a expensive sandblast

A really fine glass work the best
 

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sodablaster dude
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
What did you blast the walls with, soda? I suppose the walls are logs, and did they get a coating applied after blasting? Could be a reaction to residue left from media?
Yes, 100% sodium bicarbonate.

Walls are logs.

There's no coating.

Before and after soda blasting they used electric brushing tool 2000rpm made by Makita like that. Don't know if it help or get even worse effect.
 

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fire damage. that's the only thing I use soda on.

I would reblast with glass and start fresh. it will be very quick as you have already done the hard work.
 

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sodablaster dude
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I would reblast with glass and start fresh. it will be very quick as you have already done the hard work.
What size of glass?

Right now we got 0oC (32oF). House is still in construction, no heating. Wait on summer temperatures or no difference?

Maybe wait some time to self dry and then blast it with glass on summer?
 

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Bob
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That staining looks like it might be deep. Going to be tough to avoid eating out the softer wood grain going after it with glass IMO. Does this show up in hidden areas where you can test various remedies?
 

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sounds scary . . . what was the purpose of soda blasting a new log home interior if I may ask?
This is my question. Why did they have you blast it in the first place? I agree, that looks like water damage more than anything. If it is from you washing it down, it may be a big problem. Good luck on fixing that. Sincerely. I hate it when a simple job goes sideways.
 

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That looks like water damage.
I agree, I'm not so sure your sodablasting has anything to do with it.

The house is under construction, so the inside air is not conditioned. I think you are seeing condensation issues. The wet spots look like they are mostly forming along the floor or a concrete ledge. Is this where most of the discoloration is located? That tile and concrete will condensate a lot and it looks like the logs are wicking up the water.



On the picture above, look to the left, that drywall or primed wood is wicking up and discoloring as well. Does the stain on the left have a green tint to it as well?

Now, that tile looks like it has some green or blue in it. The tiles along the wall are cut, Did the tile guy wash off his cut tiles before placing them? I doubt it, I wouldn't either. Water condensating on the tiles could be picking up residual dust from the cut tile and wicking that color up into the logs.


In the picture above, is that concrete that the log is resting on? Is that water stain have a green tint?


In the picture above, is this stain near any tile? Does it have a green tint to it?

Finally, I checked the internet and did not find anything in wood that would react with sodium bicarbonate and turn green. Usually green indicates a copper reaction.
 

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Glen
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I would try hand sanding first. And in the least visible area first. See how far down that stain goes. As Sand pot was saying a re blast might eat away too much pith. I would suggest 100 grit paper. I doubt this is your doing. It should be on the entire surface then.
 

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sodablaster dude
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Guys, more info.

Stains comes out only after contact with water.
No matter where, ceiling or walls, it comes out all over the place, whole inside of the house.
 

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Trial and Error Opperator
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ChuckNorris said:
Guys, more info. Stains comes out only after contact with water. No matter where, ceiling or walls, it comes out all over the place, whole inside of the house.
You said that the house is in resto
Maybe ??? Moisture in the air might be pulling old stains out or extra dry wood is next to a place of a small leek

Not all your stains look like water stains
The ones near the floor I would say is water being sucked up from some place

The small specks could be spots of oil or glue
I've seem carpenters that were sloppy with over glueing they would sand it off, but when Polyurathane applied over it, it would show.
Out out of your hose ?? Off a nail gun ???

The big stains look to be a green spot from the wood in the log??? But have no answer for them
 
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