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Butcher of wood and metal
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Would not catch me on that :no: Like how the guy hooks his leg around the ladder rung . Am sure that pretty safe. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
looks like a 'handy" thing, BUT what does OSHA think? and what about the ladder manuf. companies? Is the ladder tested and or rated for that type off un-supported top end use??

Would not catch me on that :no: Like how the guy hooks his leg around the ladder rung . Am sure that pretty safe. :thumbsup:
Is a ladder structurally designed to handle that?
Not sure what the answers are. My assumption would be that it would have to meet some sort of OSHA or ANSI standards if being sold to consumers. ? Dunno. Their website says something about it being designed to rest against an object...but it doesn't look like that's how it's being advertised.

It also has a lot of side-to-side movement due to the loose fit in the hitch.

I don't believe I would use it either, but it's still kind of a neat concept.
 

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Boondockian
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Would not catch me on that :no: Like how the guy hooks his leg around the ladder rung . Am sure that pretty safe. :thumbsup:
Hooking a leg through a ladder rung like that is pretty common when you have to have both hands free.

You wouldn't catch me on that thing with that ladder. That looks like a ladder I use at work all the time and its a bit flimsy. I'm sure its safer than leaning the ladder against the tree though.


Ladder Specifications for use with the Monkeyrack:
Type 1A Industrial Grade Heavy Duty:

  • 300 pound duty rating
  • Aluminum or Fiberglass
  • 16’ to 40′
  • Topmost point of contact required for all extension ladders over 24′
Type 1AA Industrial Grade Extra Heavy Duty:

  • 375 lb. duty rating
  • Aluminum or Fiberglass
  • 28’, 30’ & 40’
  • Topmost point of contact required for all extension ladders
IMPORTANT:

Monkeyrack Products recommends that you always utilize topmost points of contact, when available as recommended by OSHA and ANSI.
MSRP is $579
 

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GC/carpenter
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44,137 Posts
Until someone forgets to put that second set of "U" Bolts" on, or makes a decision they're not needed. I can see this company in litigation a lot.
 

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If you need top support.... what is that thing accomplishing.... and how many applications are there really that you can't get some top support.....

even if you have to relocate the ladder several times.... seems easier than that set-up...

and that set-up requires you can get your truck positioned.... and you have to use a heavy duty ladder....

:no::no::no:

Might be some type of repitive work that it's applicable to.... like maybe changing parking lot lights on a commercial basis.
 

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GC/carpenter
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rselectric1 said:
I really like the concept, but only with the right ladder.
Like Mr. Mountain was saying it might be a great idea for parking lot lights and fixtures. But hell if your in that business a cherry picker just makes more since.
 

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Arborists use ladders only to enter or exit a tree, never to perform tree trimming or removal operations. There are many thousands of accidents every year caused by unqualified individuals cutting the limb that their ladder is leaning against or allowing a limb to fall on their ladder. This device may eliminate some of those hazards, but that guy should still be harnessed to the tree with a safety line at the very least. That's also an inappropriate saw for what he's doing and the chain is dangerously dull.
 

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Boondockian
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Arborists use ladders only to enter or exit a tree, never to perform tree trimming or removal operations. There are many thousands of accidents every year caused by unqualified individuals cutting the limb that their ladder is leaning against or allowing a limb to fall on their ladder. This device may eliminate some of those hazards, but that guy should still be harnessed to the tree with a safety line at the very least. That's also an inappropriate saw for what he's doing and the chain is dangerously dull.
Having the ladder leaned on the part of the limb your leaving is just as bad. When you cut off part of th limb, the remining portion jumps around from the loss of weight. Ask me how I know that?:whistling:whistling:whistling
 

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GC/carpenter
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And I spelled sense wrong. Figured I would say that before the spelling Nazi's come screaming in. :laughing:
 
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