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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
How does water and insecticide usage compare to a backpack sprayer? On an exterior barrier treatment of a house, I'm using around 1-1/2 gallons of water. Is the pesticide rate more diluted when using a power sprayer? Thanks.
 

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I'll try to give a more thorough answer later. I still have no idea what kind of work you want to do. If you are spraying weeds, a 100 gallon tank is advisable. If you are in a state where they don't do fake or extremely limited pre-treats like they do here, and you do, or plan on doing many of them, a 100 gallon tank is advisable, or even a trailer with a much bigger tank.

Pertaining to your question, it depends on how you mix and apply the product. You can go either way with either system. Most people with 50 gallon spray rigs probably apply the same amount of product on an exterior service as you do now, assuming you mix at the labelled rate, except they put it out in 10-15 gallons of water instead of 1.5.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I'll try to give a more thorough answer later. I still have no idea what kind of work you want to do. If you are spraying weeds, a 100 gallon tank is advisable. If you are in a state where they don't do fake or extremely limited pre-treats like they do here, and you do, or plan on doing many of them, a 100 gallon tank is advisable, or even a trailer with a much bigger tank.

Pertaining to your question, it depends on how you mix and apply the product. You can go either way with either system. Most people with 50 gallon spray rigs probably apply the same amount of product on an exterior service as you do now, assuming you mix at the labelled rate, except they put it out in 10-15 gallons of water instead of 1.5.
Thanks Bugman. What I'm doing is a barrier treatment for insects where the foundation meets the ground, roughly 2' up and 2' out. I see the other companies using a power sprayer for this same application. Is there an advantage? It seems cumbersome and a waste of water. The only thing I can thing of it being more of a marketing tool when a customer sees that machine, it doesn't look like something they can just do themselves. Does it save time?

I'm just trying to decide if it's something I need to buy. There must be a reason everyone uses them, right?
 

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Thanks Bugman. What I'm doing is a barrier treatment for insects where the foundation meets the ground, roughly 2' up and 2' out. I see the other companies using a power sprayer for this same application. Is there an advantage? It seems cumbersome and a waste of water. The only thing I can thing of it being more of a marketing tool when a customer sees that machine, it doesn't look like something they can just do themselves. Does it save time?

I'm just trying to decide if it's something I need to buy. There must be a reason everyone uses them, right?
If you're only going to spray up and out 2' each way and use 1.5 gallons, there's no good reason to use a rig instead of a backpack. Spray rigs are cumbersome. They take longer. They are less flexible. For instance, yesterday I did a job where I used one spray mix in the garage and one in the yard, you can't do that with a rig, especially since I used a different mix on the jobs before and after that one. Now you can have a backpack in addition to a rig and solve much of the flexibility issue.

It seems to me that one of the main reasons people use one is that it "looks more professional". Granted they will put out more volume more easily.

If you want a rig I'd build my own. That's what I did.
 

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Spray rigs aren't hard to build. I'm an electric pump fan. Tank, pump, hose reel, hose, spray handle. Put 'em together. There's really no need for a frame, I plan on rebuilding mine with the pump on top of the tank, wired direct, with an air quick connect to the reel so I can have it in there or not. If wired direct, put a fuse close to the battery so if it shorts, the fuse pops instead of catching on fire.

Rigs cost too much to buy. There's a $500-800 markup and you can make one in 4-8 hours.
 
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