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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I'm working on a flat roof garage. Turning it into an outdoor kitchen. The structure is concrete.

We will be redoing the roof membrane before adding the steel stud cabinet construction for the built-in BBQ and such.

To build these cabinets, we were planning on pouring a 4" slab to level out the surface and to have an anchoring point for the steel stud.

One roofing contractor suggested that I pour the new slab on top of the membrane. He suggested this would limit the amount of seams and that the membrane was meant to take this kind of application.

I don't feel so confident about it.

Any suggestions...
Thanks
 

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Kowboy
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I don't like this idea a bit. Where's the water going to go in the areas you've leveled?

Install the new sloped membrane, then build a level wooden deck on "sleepers". Secure the cabinets to the decking. If you ever need access to that membrane, you've got it without breaking up concrete.
 

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I don't like this idea a bit. Where's the water going to go in the areas you've leveled?

Install the new sloped membrane, then build a level wooden deck on "sleepers". Secure the cabinets to the decking. If you ever need access to that membrane, you've got it without breaking up concrete.
I just did a complete deck removal in Melbourne Beach. HOuse built in 06 slab over framed deck it was competly shot. Power lame beams below roted through. It was a 29,000 repair.
Back to the question Yes it can be done but I would explore all other options first before ever going this route
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks all,

Yes there is an engineer involved. The structure is completely concrete.

There would be channels in the concrete to allow the water to run as it normally would. The roof is single slopped so the water line is not complicated.

I figured, If ever there was a problem with the roof, the membrane could come right over top the slab, or at least up against it.

I fear that the classic sleeper system is not solid or heavy enough to hold the steel stud/cabinet/2" Stone countertop assembly.

My main concern here is the whether the membrane can take the weight of the concrete or if it will just crack.
 

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Kowboy
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I fear that the classic sleeper system is not solid or heavy enough to hold the steel stud/cabinet/2" Stone countertop assembly.
C'mon, you're not building a factory floor with loaded forklifts driving on it. It's a kitchen. What, they may have a dinner party with dancing?
 

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If you were building that kitchen in a typical house, your joist system would be 2x's at 16" o/c and 3/4 plywood decking. I would think sleepers at 16" o/c (stiffer than joists) and 5/4" decking would provide an equal level of support.
 

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concrete is about 145 per cubic foot depending on mix. Figure 4" slab is 45 lbs per sq/ft.

The structure is concrete. Is the roof concrete, too? Or is it framed?
If the roof can support the slab weight, why not double the roof membrane where you pour the slab?

Or as previously suggested, frame it. Then you'll have something to easily attach a railing too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
All valid points.
I guess I'm having a hard time describing the concern here...

The problem is that the sleepers would really only be underneath the counter, a pedestal/paver system is making up the rest of the decking area.

How would I keep the counter stable without being able to fasten down the toe kick or sleeper assembly to the concrete floor?

A concrete base would at least give the necessary weight balance. Maybe as mentioned, double up the membrane over the concrete base.
 

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Kowboy
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How would I keep the counter stable without being able to fasten down the toe kick or sleeper assembly to the concrete floor?
Epoxy some metal into the concrete, install the membrane, flash the metal, and mechanically fasten the sleepers to the metal. Fasten the cabinets/counters to the deck.
 
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