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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Starting to prep these same little double house sites over and over. Small lots, full daylight basement, front wall height 6'-9'. Front access, with 20'-24' in between with no access to the rear daylight side. Houses are roughly 25'x45'

Question- Is there a reasonable way to pour these footings without using a pump? How close will a truck get to these holes on solid ground and how much chute do they carry?

I generally always have myself and 2 laborers available onsite. No equipment such as a backhoe or skidsteer at this point.

I found a 20' chute for sale locally is what got the wheels to turning.
 

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I would either get a skid steer on site to bucket concrete or get a power buggy. Personally I wouldn't be comfortable putting a fully loaded mixer in between two foundation holes with me in one of said foundations.
 

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Around here they pump them all, even if they can get a truck all the way around. I always pile my spoils so that they have access all the way around, drive by and see them pumping it anyway.
 

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There isn't a pump in the whole county here. We just did a footer and slab using a bobcat, and we still had to shovel it across 24' to the other side first.
 

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You can use a chute. It will get you a little further. For a garage floor the chutes on the truck will let you pour to 24' pretty easy. They just need to "shoot" the concrete at first. When you pour down in a hole, you loose alot of distance. You will be shoveling concrete for a long time. Don't forget the concrete will slow down in the chute, with an extra 20' attached. By the time you spend your money on labor to move the concrete you may be close to the cost of a pump truck. My concrete buggies don't go over rough terrain very well at all. They are old though.
 

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Like Griz and others said why not use the pump. They have the smaller one, tow-behind with a hose stretching up to 200' using 3/8" 3,000 psi mix and they charge you for a 3 HR time table.
You do the whole footing in one hour give or take depending on the yardage you have and by the time you rent a skid or anything else, it will cost you less using a pump than anything else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I have always used a pumper, just curious if anyone had an ingenious idea for getting around it. Around here your looking at just under $400 to pump one footing, a little more for the additional yardage since the second footing is on the same site.

The new concrete buggies have tracks, I've heard their pretty nice.

Always have to be looking for ways to save $$.

Thanks for all the input. I can always depend on you ol' pro's to give me the bottom line.
 

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There isn't a pump in the whole county here. We just did a footer and slab using a bobcat, and we still had to shovel it across 24' to the other side first.
Where are you at in Indiana?

I worked on some buildings in Elkhart, Merrillville, Goshen, and Mishawaka. All used pumpers.
 

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Just a caution if you decide to chute it....

On a a small stemwall pour, maybe 40 feet total by 3' above grade, the job was really too small to call out a pumper economically.

The 3' grade was such that we could barely reach the one wall with about 20 feet of chute. (I had some kids nearby to shovel/push down an extended chute we hammered together.)

BUT, they sent out a "paver", not their regular truck. A pavers chute starts about a foot lower than a regular truck.

It was a "monkey f--k", but we got it poured.... just be aware of the truck you order out.

Best
 

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Will the concrete company even allow you to add a 20' chute to their truck? Hell that's adding a lot of weight and pressure to their truck and potential damage to not only the truck but also those working around it.

Loosen up the purse strings, get a pump, get it done in a 1/4 of the time working off a chute, using wheelbarrows, your guys will appreciate it and so will your back.
 

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Where are you at in Indiana?

I worked on some buildings in Elkhart, Merrillville, Goshen, and Mishawaka. All used pumpers.
Marion. Pump trucks have been brought in from other places for big jobs, mostly commercial, but I don't believe any of the plants in Grant county have a pumper.
 

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Marion. Pump trucks have been brought in from other places for big jobs, mostly commercial, but I don't believe any of the plants in Grant county have a pumper.
Around here, at least for small residential work, the pump is an independent contractor. On a trailer, shows up at the same time as the first truck. I just take the guy recommended by the concrete plant.
 
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