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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I poured (pumped) two sets of footings yesterday. Went out today and one set has quiet a few cracks, most running length wise down the center.

-It doesn't have rebar except for uprights on 40" centers.

DETAILS
-24" wide x 12" thick

-flat, no steps.

-It did drop to just below freezing last night

I assume it froze.

Why did one crack and not the other?

How big an issue is it?

What can I do to prevent this in the future?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's a new GC, I'm working for. I did the estimate up with just that 2- #4 length wise. He said, no bar needed. 5th house that I know of that he built this way. His engineer and the city inspectors approved it... I would certainly be less concerned if they had rebar.
 

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diplomat
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No rebar? That's not a footing, that's some well consolidated soil. Rebar or not, cracks in a day is weird. Like there was movement while it was setting.
 

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No rebar does not sound right for a footing approved or not.

What was the mix you pumped?

It does sound more like CDF and odds are it was pumped way too wet to make it flow easier/quicker in the trench.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Came from Southern Concrete Materials. 3000psi pump mix with 3/8" stone.

As for too wet, it's a possibility but we did 2 foundations side by side, didn't see a change in consistency.

The one with cracks, did have a sandy-er soil....?
 

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What was the slump and mix?

Generally when cracks appear withing 24 hours it was a wet mix, like griz said.

I don't pretend to know your locale or what is acceptable there, but I always put 4 #5 rebar with stirrups in footings or atleast 4 #5 tied to stakes. Steel is pretty cheap, especially when you consider what is going on top of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Used a reputable pumping contractor, I let them do there thing. I'm not sure about the slump they went with but the mix didn't seem excessively wet.

One thing is for certain... it is cracked.

How big a deal is this since it doesn't have rebar?

I might stop by and take some pictures if I get over that way before dark.
 

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Used a reputable pumping contractor, I let them do there thing. I'm not sure about the slump they went with but the mix didn't seem excessively wet.

One thing is for certain... it is cracked.

How big a deal is this since it doesn't have rebar?

I might stop by and take some pictures if I get over that way before dark.
Is it for venner stone or to hold the house up?

You should always check the slump yourself and approve the consistency before you allow it to be pumped. It's your azz.
 

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Used a reputable pumping contractor, I let them do there thing. I'm not sure about the slump they went with but the mix didn't seem excessively wet.

One thing is for certain... it is cracked.

How big a deal is this since it doesn't have rebar?

I might stop by and take some pictures if I get over that way before dark.
How stable/compact was the ground where the cracked one was poured?

You said it was sandy-er, was it compacted, native soil?

Any Geo-Tech done?

No rebar could be huge depending on how it needs to perform.

How big/deep are the cracks? Use a wire, hacksaw blade etc to tell.

Another scenario, although long odds, is a bad mix.
 

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It could be a bad mix if it came from southern. He could have gotten a load someone else rejected and he got it. What plant did it come from and how far from plant was the pour.
 

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I don't know about your city, but we have to have everything documented and our cities dictate to us how much water can be in the mix. It's not at our discretion like in the old days. Hell back then the finishers called out how much water. It's very clear that they will add the water based on time and ease of finishing.
 

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We've poured footers with no rebar, engineered govt. job. Engineer said "where's it gonna go" This is buried both sides stem wall. I kind of agree with him. Not how we do it, but I don't know that I would call it wrong. Just saying it may not be as wrong as you might think.

It would have to be pretty damn cold for that mud to freeze the first night. If you didn't think to cover it, I doubt it was cold enough.

Cracks down the middle of the length seems strange.
 

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I don't know about your city, but we have to have everything documented and our cities dictate to us how much water can be in the mix. It's not at our discretion like in the old days. Hell back then the finishers called out how much water. It's very clear that they will add the water based on time and ease of finishing.
I handle the mud the way my grandpa did long before I was born, I am the guy writing the check and I decide the consistency. The finishers (at least here) always want more water.

My second pour as the lead guy was when I was 19 on a boat dock crew. The lead concrete guy almost came after me with a shovel. Lol

Good thing he didn't
 
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We've poured footers with no rebar, engineered govt. job. Engineer said "where's it gonna go" This is buried both sides stem wall. I kind of agree with him. Not how we do it, but I don't know that I would call it wrong. Just saying it may not be as wrong as you might think.

It would have to be pretty damn cold for that mud to freeze the first night. If you didn't think to cover it, I doubt it was cold enough.

Cracks down the middle of the length seems strange.
The reason I said "locale" in my first post.

Things are done different everywhere
 
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Here's my theory: it was cold enough that the vertical rebar conducted the freeze down into the footing overnight. The footing splits ala feathers and wedges. Is the split in line with the uprights? I'm completely making it up, of course, but I'll bet I could make it happen that way on purpose if I wanted. Especially if it was cold enough to slow down the cure. Especially if someone bumped the verticals a couple times and they were a little sloshy. Just a thought, anyway.

Also, just because piling on is fun, the absence of rebar is kind of surprising.

Edit: Although at 40" centers it's a little less likely. Second thoughts. Third thoughts - it's the most likely direction of the split.


Edit: Well, it was an idea. I don't think my theory works, having seen the pictures.
 
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