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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I have been building post frame buildings for the past couple years. Ocasionally we have roof to wall cuts to make. Actually two in the last two years which included valley cuts and wall cuts.

I am trying to come up with a way to consistently cut the same angle. I have used guillotine shears, tin snips, circular saw with a steel blade.

Does anyone else have any other ways that they make their cuts.
 

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Ok, I have been building post frame buildings for the past couple years. Ocasionally we have roof to wall cuts to make. Actually two in the last two years which included valley cuts and wall cuts.

I am trying to come up with a way to consistently cut the same angle. I have used guillotine shears, tin snips, circular saw with a steel blade.

Does anyone else have any other ways that they make their cuts.
Upside down and a skilsaw with a stabilizer blade and straight edge. Usually I will mark it with a piece that has the angle already on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok, I the last system that I used was a straight edge clamped to the tin and us it as a guide for my saw. I did gang cut about 10 sheets of steel that made the cuts uniform but if that angle is slightly off that the line isn't perfect.

My problem is getting the perfect angle so everything lines up nicely, I might just make a few jigs for my saw to run on.

I need to make at least 3 to get started, 4/12, 3.5/12 & 3/12 are the most common pitches that I encounter. The odd ones are for the tin that drops into the valley on intersecting planes for the roof, The last roof was something like 46.5 degrees at the valley.

Maybe I will make an adjustable template for Gang cutting.


I hate asking questions than answering myself, but I guess is helps to put it out there.
 

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For the valleys I snap lines out maybe 9 or 12 feet from the sheets on over into the valley
Snap the valley line
Measure where the sheets in the valley intersect the valley line i snapped
Lay out 3 or 4 sheets in the ground
Transfer the numbers you measured from the valley
Snap a line on the sheets laid out
Cut with shear and put them on the roof
Valley line always looks perfectly straight
Sounds confusing when I try to explain it but its real easy
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Donohue Const said:
For the valleys I snap lines out maybe 9 or 12 feet from the sheets on over into the valley
Snap the valley line
Measure where the sheets in the valley intersect the valley line i snapped
Lay out 3 or 4 sheets in the ground
Transfer the numbers you measured from the valley
Snap a line on the sheets laid out
Cut with shear and put them on the roof
Valley line always looks perfectly straight
Sounds confusing when I try to explain it but its real easy
I understand your explanation, thank you.
 

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building Contractor
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
mako1 said:
I use Hitachi nibblers.If I'm making a lot of the same cuts for valleys I will just make a template but usually use the last piece cutoff.Sometimes a 4' bevel square.
I think using an adjustable t square would work. Thanks for the advise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My question now is why don't I own a set of nibblers? Lol

I own cordless shears, corded shears, all kinds of tin snips, but no nibblers.....im thinking the Makita Cordless nibblers will be a future purchase, very near future.
 
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