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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK. Thought I'd start a new thread here. Lots of activities going on here, and I wouldn't mind some suggestions.

I've had my engineer look at this and give an opinion as well, as the HO's were concerned about the structure being a little suspect.

The pic below is from the initial proposal I gave them. The numbers indicate many things wrong with the porch which need to be addressed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
The columns will need repointing. Right now the mortar between is all but deteriorated. The middle column is a disaster as the main beam is resting on the base block, and as a result the next block up is only 3/4 there. The whole column is tipsy to the point that I don't really trust it. Once we get the stairs off I'll be able to see what it looks like.

For repairing the rotting columns I'm pretty sure I'm going to re-use the existing columns (pretty much solid wood) and replace the bottom six inches with a 10x10 block of douglas fir. It will be resting on a galvanized steel plate to keep it off the cement to hopefully prevent rot a bit better. Then I will cover that up with a higher piece of paintable PVC trim (havent locked in on this yet - not sure if PVC will look ok)

More soon with pics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
First post with repaired block is installed. We are going to raise it up and put some galv steel plates between it and the column to keep it from wicking moisture. Fir base will ultimately be hidden in trim.

The columns are missing a lot of mortar. Took the pressure washer and blew out loose debris. Going to fill the inside with mortar on edges as deep as it can go. May also try to fill inside with nonshrink grout iffn we can squirt it in there. Going to try a mortar bag to get it in there.

Property Wall Brickwork Building House
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Here are some progression shots. The ground floor columns all had the rotted base repaired. I used douglas fir and cut a chunk about 8" to roughly match the tapered shape of the original column. Then I bondo'd the two together and sanded it down. I raised the wood off of the flat stone using composite shims around the edges so the wood would not rest on the stone.

The last step was to trim out the exterior with PVC, hiding the fir replacement, and protecting the wood. I will leave the base unsealed and free to breath from underneath.
 

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Looks good:thumbsup:

Did you dowel those blocks into the post?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
We opted to not tear this down entirely to avoid the permit/variance process when constructing from scratch. Instead I ended up getting my engineer to write a letter / final inspection so that the city is happy should they stop by wondering why we don't have a permit.

This shows some of the rot we were dealing with. The porch was pulling away from the house - and one side was attached with only one 6" nail. Not any more! Lags, brackets everywhere now.

We sistered up the rafters on the main floor without removng the roof planks. We had to replace some, not all. The second storey roof pretty much had to be replaced, but I left the original rafters there and box above the columns below the roof.

Since it's usually below freezing these days we've missed the window to paint. So we primed everything off site in a shop w/ slow drying oil primer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Looks good:thumbsup:

Did you dowel those blocks into the post?

Kind of. The original post was a tapered 2x10 hollow box. We attached a block on top of the fir that slid into the underside of the column, like a couple of pieces of lego. PL'ed and nailed the two together before bondo.

I really liked using the bondo - reminded me of working on my first car doing body work :)
 

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What are you going to do about the rotted beam?

Wood Table Lumber Roof Furniture

It's cancerous you won't be able to keep condensation out of the rot. You are replacing it aren't you?
 
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