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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need more durable paints and was considering using porch and floor
paints on some cabinets and doors that get a lot of abuse. I think I
read in This Old House about a guy using clear water based polyurethane
coats over regular latex enamel to increase durability. I know they
do that on cars but I think I would rather just use a tougher paint
which a porch and floor paint must be.

I have been unconventional in a lot of my activities such as using
boat bottom paint on shower walls and ceilings of my own home and
owned rental properties ( absolutely nothing better for durability and
mildew resistance !) and I also always use latex exterior paint for interior walls and trim without any apparent negatives. Exterior paint
for bathrooms just seems like common sense with all the moisture etc.

I just assume exterior paints have to be tougher in all regards and it has worked out for me but I have no reference for comparison.

Also with regards to maintenance of owned properties, my inventory
of paints and partial gallons etc has been reduced since I only now buy
exterior paints.

Though I would never trust the toughness of a one part paint of any kind on a walking surface I do feel like the one part porch and floor paints must be tougher enough to consider on doors and cabinets.
Like everyone I would prefer to use water clean up paints and it appears most of the big paint mfgrs do have porch and floor latex
paints although some seemingly discourage foot traffic and advise
avoidance of garage use. I have to wonder how they can have
a porch and floor product and discourage direct foot traffic ? ? ?

BTW, I am a little reluctant to sell the boat bottom paint in bathrooms
on remodel jobs ( you have to as the paint is at least twice as much )
because I dont want any future legal problems whatever they might
be but it has worked like a miracle for me.
 

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Considering copper may be the next lead, and there really isn't a reason to use copper bottom paint in a house, I'd skip that particular practice.

Porch and floor paint dries fast to a hard film. I'm not sure I'd characterize it as a tougher film, it really just formulated so you can walk on it the same day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Considering copper may be the next lead, and there really isn't a reason to use copper bottom paint in a house, I'd skip that particular practice.

Porch and floor paint dries fast to a hard film. I'm not sure I'd characterize it as a tougher film, it really just formulated so you can walk on it the same day.
The reason is toughness and longevity and mildew resistance. Nothing else comes close.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I wouldn't ever use exterior paints inside. I just use high quality interior paints.

Do you have any reason why or are you just a victim of paint mfgrs advertising and scheme to gain shelf space in stores ? ?

I'm saying I have never had a problem with any exterior paint on
the interior but I am relatively certain interior paints would not work
on the outside.

But what about the porch and floor paints ?
 

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The reason is toughness and longevity and mildew resistance. Nothing else comes close.
I don't think repainting every 20 years is a big deal. Even a not so good paint will go 10 years, or really bad paints last just a couple. For me, that's solving a problem I don't have.

Use exterior paints in a rental, and you're setting yourself (the owner) up for hidden health hazard issues. Not all components of exterior paints are approved for interior use. Around here, that's be give the renter every dollar they ever spent on rent back, plus damages, etc.
 

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You can buy urethane and epoxie paints that are formulated for interior use. Also, ignoring mildewicides, the pigment you use makes a big difference on mildew resistance. I just don't see the issue here. You can get the same performance without using copper bottom paint, you just aren't going to get urethane or epoxy performance with a latex acrylic paint.

You also aren't going to get urethane performance (used for cabinets these days) with latex acrylic porch paint.
 

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Do you have any reason why or are you just a victim of paint mfgrs advertising and scheme to gain shelf space in stores ? ?

I'm saying I have never had a problem with any exterior paint on
the interior but I am relatively certain interior paints would not work
on the outside.

But what about the porch and floor paints ?
The additives used in ext paints don't lend themselves to interior use, as hdavis mentioned.

I have never had durability issues with Regal or Aura for interior paint applications. As far as using porch paint for cabinets and trim, there are several options available. If you don't want to use Satin Impervo alkyd paint, there's waterbornes like Satin Impervo 314 or Advance as well as Inslx cabinet coat. All of which I would select before using the wrong product because of some mistakenly perceived benefit.

There's always going to be guys who think they have the "scheme" figured out and they won't be "fooled" by it. Then there are those who will use the correct products for the correct applications.
 

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I need more durable paints and was considering using porch and floor
paints on some cabinets and doors that get a lot of abuse. I think I
read in This Old House about a guy using clear water based polyurethane
coats over regular latex enamel to increase durability. I know they
do that on cars but I think I would rather just use a tougher paint
which a porch and floor paint must be.

I have been unconventional in a lot of my activities such as using
boat bottom paint on shower walls and ceilings of my own home and
owned rental properties ( absolutely nothing better for durability and
mildew resistance !) and I also always use latex exterior paint for interior walls and trim without any apparent negatives. Exterior paint
for bathrooms just seems like common sense with all the moisture etc.

I just assume exterior paints have to be tougher in all regards and it has worked out for me but I have no reference for comparison.

Also with regards to maintenance of owned properties, my inventory
of paints and partial gallons etc has been reduced since I only now buy
exterior paints.

Though I would never trust the toughness of a one part paint of any kind on a walking surface I do feel like the one part porch and floor paints must be tougher enough to consider on doors and cabinets.
Like everyone I would prefer to use water clean up paints and it appears most of the big paint mfgrs do have porch and floor latex
paints although some seemingly discourage foot traffic and advise
avoidance of garage use. I have to wonder how they can have
a porch and floor product and discourage direct foot traffic ? ? ?

BTW, I am a little reluctant to sell the boat bottom paint in bathrooms
on remodel jobs ( you have to as the paint is at least twice as much )
because I dont want any future legal problems whatever they might
be but it has worked like a miracle for me.
They make interior paint and exterior paint for a reason... and they make coatings specific to cabinets...

Agualente from ML Campbell... http://www.mlcampbell.com/products/agualente

Cabinet Coat

Cabinet Rescue

Are just a few...
 

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Using exterior paints indoors is a dumb idea. They contain chemicals not approved for indoor use. Are your renters still alive or on oxygen?
That's not quite accurate as solvent based interior paints are used indoors all the time, and they gas out as they dry.

Thinking that one is going to get more durable a coating on inside trim by using a deck paint is ridiculous.
 

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I was told the ext. have the UV inhibitors and mildecides and a few other chemicals to slow fading and such and these can off gas for a long time making them very bad for int. use. But I'm not a chemist.
 

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I needed to paint my basement and used porch and floor on the vertical masonry walls because of water stains. It worked great. Porch and floor is really good at coverage, has a low viscosity that will work into pores well and resists bleeding like crazy without the pain of oil or shellac, dries fast and sticks hard.
 

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That's not quite accurate as solvent based interior paints are used indoors all the time, and they gas out as they dry.

Thinking that one is going to get more durable a coating on inside trim by using a deck paint is ridiculous.
Solvent based interior paints aren't the same as exterior paints different chemicals.
 

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The additives used in ext paints don't lend themselves to interior use, as hdavis mentioned.

I have never had durability issues with Regal or Aura for interior paint applications. As far as using porch paint for cabinets and trim, there are several options available. If you don't want to use Satin Impervo alkyd paint, there's waterbornes like Satin Impervo 314 or Advance as well as Inslx cabinet coat. All of which I would select before using the wrong product because of some mistakenly perceived benefit.

There's always going to be guys who think they have the "scheme" figured out and they won't be "fooled" by it. Then there are those who will use the correct products for the correct applications.
I'm very interested in the options you listed. You sound like your first pick for cabinets would be Satin Impervo alkyd paint? Would you explain the differences between the 4 you named? I'm looking at the Satin Impervo but I don't see specific mention of using this on cabinets. On the website I was using to look at the Satin Impervo, it listed Benjamin Moore Regal Select Interior Semi Gloss or Benjamin Moore Regal Select Interior Pearl for cabinets.Do you have opinions or experience with those?
 

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I'm very interested in the options you listed. You sound like your first pick for cabinets would be Satin Impervo alkyd paint? Would you explain the differences between the 4 you named? I'm looking at the Satin Impervo but I don't see specific mention of using this on cabinets. On the website I was using to look at the Satin Impervo, it listed Benjamin Moore Regal Select Interior Semi Gloss or Benjamin Moore Regal Select Interior Pearl for cabinets.Do you have opinions or experience with those?
The last post in this thread is from 2015, if you get a response I will be surprised.


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