Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my wife has finally convinced me to build a pool. It is going to be vinyl liner pool with a block wall. 8" block 5 courses high. I am trying to decide what approach to take.

Back in the 80's as a college student I worked for a pool company during the summers on Long Island. We would pour the 4" footing "dry" using concrete sand and portland. We would then lay the first course directly into the footing. Then we would drystack the blocks and apply surecoat (the fiberglass mortar stuff) to both sides of the walls. This would take a 5 man crew 1 day. The claim then was using surecoat is 5x stronger than mortar joints. I don't think the company uses this method anymore but has switched to steel or fiberglass walls.

My other approach I am considering is standard concrete footing with a block and mortar wall. Installing rebar and core filling every 2' or so. Maybe even running rebar horizontilly along the top course and pouring a bond beam (this may be overkill).

What would you do?

Also, what are your thoughts on using the "dry footing" on either scenario. It would be less time consuming and I could save $ on a ready mix order.

Last quesion: I am planning on installing some type of stone or concrete paver coping. What would be best to adhere it to the block. Type s, Thinset, glue? I would think thinset would be the strongest.

Thanks,
Mike
 

·
Pompass Ass
Joined
·
2,090 Posts
So my wife has finally convinced me to build a pool. It is going to be vinyl liner pool with a block wall. 8" block 5 courses high. I am trying to decide what approach to take.

Back in the 80's as a college student I worked for a pool company during the summers on Long Island. We would pour the 4" footing "dry" using concrete sand and portland. We would then lay the first course directly into the footing. Then we would drystack the blocks and apply surecoat (the fiberglass mortar stuff) to both sides of the walls. This would take a 5 man crew 1 day. The claim then was using surecoat is 5x stronger than mortar joints. I don't think the company uses this method anymore but has switched to steel or fiberglass walls.

My other approach I am considering is standard concrete footing with a block and mortar wall. Installing rebar and core filling every 2' or so. Maybe even running rebar horizontilly along the top course and pouring a bond beam (this may be overkill).

What would you do?

Also, what are your thoughts on using the "dry footing" on either scenario. It would be less time consuming and I could save $ on a ready mix order.

Last quesion: I am planning on installing some type of stone or concrete paver coping. What would be best to adhere it to the block. Type s, Thinset, glue? I would think thinset would be the strongest.

Thanks,
Mike
Must be a regional thing in Florida our pools are built by digging a hole, installing a bunch of steel rebar and then shooting the shell with Shotcrete, the walls and floor are one piece, with walls being a minimum of 8" thick.
 

·
Professional Instigator
Joined
·
6,872 Posts
Must be a regional thing in Florida our pools are built by digging a hole, installing a bunch of steel rebar and then shooting the shell with Shotcrete, the walls and floor are one piece, with walls being a minimum of 8" thick.
That is how it is done here as well.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top