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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey there, newbie here
I teach construction and can't find a reason to not build a pole barn on a slab.
It would be easier to pour the cement, I would anchor posts with a steel anchor, plenty of re-bar.


What are your thoughts?
 

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When I was building pole barns this is how I attached to slabs.
Or I should say this is how the engineers at the pole barn manufacture wanted us to attach to slabs.
 

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Quad Racer said:
My thoughts are

1 I'm glad your'e at least asking since you're unsure.
2 How did you become a teacher being unsure?
If you're sure, love to hear your thoughts.

This sounds like a legitimate question to me that may spawn into new product links from guys on this forum that do this somewhat frequently.

Stand down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have taught my students to never be afraid to ask a question, and I am just saying I can't find a single reason to refrain from building on a slab.

I would use a footing below the frost line for each post, but attach at the surface with a steel strap/tie down embedded into the wet cement.

What am I not thinking of? What am I missing?

I am never ashamed to admit I don't know it all.
 

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I have taught my students to never be afraid to ask a question, and I am just saying I can't find a single reason to refrain from building on a slab.

I would use a footing below the frost line for each post, but attach at the surface with a steel strap/tie down embedded into the wet cement.

What am I not thinking of? What am I missing?

I am never ashamed to admit I don't know it all.
Well you didn't mention using a footing in your first post. So I was going off of the information that was provided.

And tenon you're not in a position to command me to stand down. I dont know who the he11 you are.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Another good reason to build from a slab is that I could cut the notches and then cut the posts to EXACT length before erecting which is a ton easier.

What am I missing? Why does everyone insist on burying the posts, cutting to length after they are up..........?????

IF you cut notches first, it seems like a chore to make sure they are the same height when setting in concrete
 

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We've built several timber frames on slabs and on grade beams. One thing you have to remember is pole barn buildings are point bearing structures. So your slab has to be sufficient enough to support the bearing weight of the posts. Then it needs to be anchored for wind depending on your area. For garage sized builds we usually just use a slab with a thickened edge. For larger buildings we have been doing grade beams with piles and then tying in the floor.
 

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Now re read the first post. Sorry but it sounds like your trying to build a pole barn on a slab on grade with "plenty of rebar". Its your first post so excuse me for being harsh. You need to provide better information to get a real answer to your question from now on.
 

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Most pole barn manufactures use a 3 ply or 4 ply post. It's usually southern yellow pine. The trusses slip in the "pocket" between the ply's. You level the truss by installing blocking in the pocket. After the truss is set you cut the "ears" flush with the top of the truss.
 

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This building required poured footers 4' down (frost line). The posts were set on the footers then packed with dirt and tamped in lifts. You can see the lower 1/3 of the post are pressure treated.
The slab was the last thing to be poured. The bottom girt board we place around the bottom of the building (see pic) is at finished floor height(top of board).
On a smaller building pouring a slab with a turn down footer can be done if local codes allow and anchoring can be done with sills, anchor bolts and L plates. Like mentioned point of bearing and wind shear are big main concerns when anchoring to a slab.
 

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Hey there, newbie here
I teach construction and can't find a reason to not build a pole barn on a slab.
It would be easier to pour the cement, I would anchor posts with a steel anchor, plenty of re-bar.


What are your thoughts?
If you're sinking the poles, you can just put the form board on the inside of the posts. The two don't have to be tied together, and the slab isn't really needed in the wall area, depending on what you're doing with the building.

OTOH, sunk poles will rot eventually, and there's the added length of the poles to deal with. To me, pole barns with built up members on a slab are really timber framed or possibly balloon framed.

Nothing wrong with doing these a few different ways.
 

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Quad Racer said:
And tenon you're not in a position to command me to stand down. I dont know who the he11 you are.
My apologies.

I read your response as a prelude to "harass the possible DIY/HO" post.

It's interesting what happens when we both assume things.
 

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To the OP:

Is there steel sticking up from the slab in pre- determined locations?

I.e.: post locations

Or

Is it a totally flat slab with "lots of rebar" poured within?

Two different situations and two
Different solutions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I haven't begun the project yet. I would pour the footings below frost line with the slab over the top, similar to monolithic pour.

The advantage in MY mind:
a) I can cut notches and then cut posts to EXACT length
b) Pouring concrete much easier without walls to get in way
c) Not having to level each post individually, hold in place until cement dries.

Thanks for all your input so far
 

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sylobeg said:
I haven't begun the project yet. I would pour the footings below frost line with the slab over the top, similar to monolithic pour.

The advantage in MY mind:
a) I can cut notches and then cut posts to EXACT length
b) Pouring concrete much easier without walls to get in way
c) Not having to level each post individually, hold in place until cement dries.

Thanks for all your input so far
How about these?

image-1280293722.jpg

If you insert traditional J anchors into the wet cement.

Or if you're a bit more tenacious:



image-3904505470.jpg

Both can be inserted during the pour and you can leave the pesky posts out until the concrete cures.

By the way;

Speaking to your new status to the forum:

It's is customary and "good policy" to introduce yourself to the forum along with what you do in the intro page.

Welcome to CT.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
By all means :)

My name is Randy,

"Hey you" works too

I have been a contractor for 22 years, built everything under the sun except for a pole barn.

I teach construction, and have taught industrial arts for 24 years.

Getting back into contracting because of the laziness and disrespect of our young..............kids. but that is the subject of another post.

Glad to be in the presence of all you hardworking nail slingers
 

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What am I missing? Why does everyone insist on burying the posts, cutting to length after they are up..........?????
Digging holes is fast and easy in many parts of the country. Originally, the hole would just be backfilled with the post in place.
 

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tenon0774 said:
How about these? If you insert traditional J anchors into the wet cement. Or if you're a bit more tenacious: Both can be inserted during the pour and you can leave the pesky posts out until the concrete cures. By the way; Speaking to your new status to the forum: It's is customary and "good policy" to introduce yourself to the forum along with what you do in the intro page. Welcome to CT.
Do not use those.
 
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