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Fortune and glory, kid.
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2,284 Posts
Thread back from the dead.

From the preservation brief:

"Although property owners cannot duplicate the years of accumulated knowledge and craft skills of a professional plasterer, there are materials that can be used for do-it-yourself repairs. For example, fine cracks can be filled with an all-purpose drywall joint compound. For bridging larger cracks using fiberglass tape, a homeowner can use a "quicksetting" joint compound. This compound has a fast drying time--60, 90, or 120 minutes. Quick-setting joint compound dries because of a chemical reaction, not because of water evaporation. It shrinks less than all-purpose joint compound and has much the same workability as ready-mix base-coat plaster. However, because quick-set joint compounds are hard to sand, they should only be used to bed tape or to fill large holes. All-purpose point compound should be used as the final coat prior to sanding. "

Doesn't this conflict with what folks are saying?
 

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Master Craftsman
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12 Posts
From the preservation brief:

"Although property owners cannot duplicate the years of accumulated knowledge and craft skills of a professional plasterer, there are materials that can be used for do-it-yourself repairs. For example, fine cracks can be filled with an all-purpose drywall joint compound. For bridging larger cracks using fiberglass tape, a homeowner can use a "quicksetting" joint compound. This compound has a fast drying time--60, 90, or 120 minutes. Quick-setting joint compound dries because of a chemical reaction, not because of water evaporation. It shrinks less than all-purpose joint compound and has much the same workability as ready-mix base-coat plaster. However, because quick-set joint compounds are hard to sand, they should only be used to bed tape or to fill large holes. All-purpose point compound should be used as the final coat prior to sanding. "

Doesn't this conflict with what folks are saying?
No conflict, as this talks about patching plaster,not joining two dissimilar materials and hoping they both expand and contract at the same rate... which they wont.
 

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Preserving the Past
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3,571 Posts

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Fortune and glory, kid.
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2,284 Posts

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Preserving the Past
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3,571 Posts
Interesting photo's. Great looking workmanship. On listed buildings here English Heritage make you replace the timber laths and replaster with lime.
This is all hydrated lime based. Much harder when it cures and I wouldn't recommend the base coats for residential work. You'll have a tough time driving a nail through it.

Got the job wrapped up. cleaned up, and looking like a church again today. :)

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150161610851236.302691.366046046235&type=1
 

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Just Jennifer - The Paint
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194 Posts
Here's the deally. Im doing a bunch of plaster gut and repair in a 102 year old home some walls and ceilings are getting completely torn out but whats the best way to butt into the old plaster which has the wood lathe behind it.
I have done some "impossible" patches with "durabond 90" and it has held up in a few cases I know of, 9 & 10 years and better than 15 on my personal residence and not a crack yet. This would work mid wall. Just finish up with regular mud.
 

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Nail It!!!!!!!!!!!!
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12 Posts
IF you've been plastering for 10 years? your not a plasterer... your a finisher. Plaster in that regard is an insult to people like me. that can take that wood lathe and wire mesh .. throw 5/8" fiber plaster on the wood lathe. and mix up some lime and gauging and Match any texture or plaster finish in the house.. . so without further insult to your claim to fame. your the reason Plastering is a lost art !!! and in 10 years you have no idea what Plaster really is. it was replaced in the 70's with drywall. then the woncote wonder came into light ..

Just saying.. and you'll be back doing (repairs) out of your pocket$$$$$
 

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Just Jennifer - The Paint
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194 Posts
IF you've been plastering for 10 years? your not a plasterer... your a finisher. Plaster in that regard is an insult to people like me. that can take that wood lathe and wire mesh .. throw 5/8" fiber plaster on the wood lathe. and mix up some lime and gauging and Match any texture or plaster finish in the house.. . so without further insult to your claim to fame. your the reason Plastering is a lost art !!! and in 10 years you have no idea what Plaster really is. it was replaced in the 70's with drywall. then the woncote wonder came into light ..

Just saying.. and you'll be back doing (repairs) out of your pocket$$$$$
I was not making any "claim to fame". I do what I need to do to put on paint that will last. I just happened to find, over time, durabod seems to practically cement anything. If I were making any claims to a knowledge of plaster (beyond the effects it can have on paint) you would be justified to feel insulted. The man appeared to be working both drywall and plaster. For the HO, its often a balance between quality and cost. ("Just what level of perfection are we talking about here") I do not expect you to know how to restore fine woods but if you told me of a particular practice that had worked for you, I would not be insulted, I'd take heed. One never can tell if or when another's non-trade, experience will serve us well.
 

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Balding quickly
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954 Posts
hmmm seems the only way your gunna get away with this is if we all die before it cracks. I have done what the original poster mentioned in a law office and was there 4 years later and no cracks. Temps here range from 105 to -35. I can see why in most instance it would. When I did it I didn't think it looked like it would work even for a day but my boss told me too.
 
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