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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's the deally. Im doing a bunch of plaster gut and repair in a 102 year old home some walls and ceilings are getting completely torn out but whats the best way to butt into the old plaster which has the wood lathe behind it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
geesh

i know thats what i was afraid off theres only one spot i had to blend old with new and that was on the ceiling i used some ten inch wide nylon mesh tape to cover the seem and i hop nothing cracks.
 

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Thom
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the wide tape helps, hot mud helps, but in the end, you are joining dissimilar materials of dissimilar thicknesses.
 

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I've heard of a "wallpaper" they use to blend the seams of new to old.
Not real up on it but I bet there's a way..........
 

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Preserving the Past
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plaster is on the inside of the house bubba. climate control baby
I'm working on the assumption that 102 year old plastered homes have poor (if any) insulation and alot of thermal transfer. When bandboards get cold, the joist bays get cold. Your plaster over wood lathe is much more dense than todays wallboard, and one is going to expand/contract faster than the other. Depending on the insulation situation, 102 years old probably nill, i'll stand by my comment. I hope that i'm wrong, but my experiences tell me otherwise.
 

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Preserving the Past
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i have been plastering for 10 years i think i know what im doing.:clap:
Then first, why did you ask, and second, why on earth would you butt sheetrock to plaster in the middle of any wall or ceiling?:no:

You either re-plaster the area or remove all the plaster to the nearest corners of the space and replace it all with sheetrock.

BTW, I've been in this industry for over 23 years and I'm still learning something new every day.
 

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Working
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i have been plastering for 10 years i think i know what im doing.:clap:
:rolleyes::whistling

Well you should still read that link as I do a lot of historic work and have to use those guidlines and practices. Otherwise it won't pass the historic register qualifications.

Cole
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Then first, why did you ask, and second, why on earth would you butt sheetrock to plaster in the middle of any wall or ceiling?:no:

You either re-plaster the area or remove all the plaster to the nearest corners of the space and replace it all with sheetrock.

BTW, I've been in this industry for over 23 years and I'm still learning something new every day.
To be honest i was havent really done to many houses that old in the time spand. Ok tell me this.. It was in a hall way which is about 4'x20'. Also it was an insurance job which has a budget which you can't increase, the repair area was towards the back of the hallway. Soo if i were to do as you suggested would add that much more rip out and install(not an option). Its going on day five from original plaster and so far there has been no cracks and yes there has been a 25 degree temp change as well. So maybe this is yet another chance for you to learn something new.
 

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Preserving the Past
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The Brief that is posted pretty much backs up everything that's been advised to you here. If you feel good about letting the insurance company tell you how to do it differently, that's all on you. The repair you've done may last 2 weeks, 2 months, or 2 years. WHEN it fails they won't blame the insurance company, they will blame you.
 
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