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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a residential remodeler and am currently building a schedule for a project to start in a few weeks. My scheduling is typically pretty good; however, ever since COVID hit, it's been a wreck. Ex. I currently have a project that is 2 months behind (9 month build schedule). Due to this, I'm trying to be more realistic about my subs and vendors and plan in A LOT of float time.

What methods do people use to build this much extra time into your Gantt chart? Ex. Do you take a 10-day electrical job and just plugin 20 days? Do you build in extra tasks called "delays" everywhere?

Thanks for your thoughts.
 

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No, don't arbitrarily add days.

Add/adjust as it becomes necessary.

Some things will be on time or ahead others will lag.

Just arbitrarily adding time on account of because, you will lose credibility and the schedule will mean less than it already does...

IME, schedules are no good before they are printed.
 

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3 Jacks 2 Nines
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depends on the size of the project, schedule, delay and reason for delay.... 3 week look ahead... I build in specific delay activities... on a complete schedule for a new home build I might only show significant delays that are detrimental to the project. Both of these examples are for record.

When building a new schedule in the covid era prior to starting the project I will put float into everything AND put in a couple of delay tasks so that when reviewing with the client the topic can be discussed and expectations are set.
 

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Don't call it a delay. For your event “Electrical rough” add a predecessor “electrical mobilization” and give it a duration of how far in advance you need to alert the electrician. You can always change the duration to see how sooner or later affects the project.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
bwiab and Half-fast Eddie, you answered the question. I know for a fact that my subs are going to take longer than they usually do, so I have to build it in the schedule. That being said, I don't want my clients to see it.
 

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GC
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No, don't arbitrarily add days.

Add/adjust as it becomes necessary.

Some things will be on time or ahead others will lag.

Just arbitrarily adding time on account of because, you will lose credibility and the schedule will mean less than it already does...

IME, schedules are no good before they are printed.
This is exactly right. A schedule is simply a way of tracking how much stress you're going through.

I remember working with my father about 50 years back and a client asked him about the schedule, his response was "it will be done the day I finish".
Wish I could get away with that.
 

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Any seasoned contractor knows schedules can be useless/stress traps. Roffing hangers @ Cannon A.F.B. moons ago got 2 weeks rain where it never rains. Electronics, s/r ruined put us deep in trap & 3 weeks back. Add in govt. inspectors the whole 9. Can you guess how well we did there. Much younger then, but I learned my in w/government contracts didn’t mean chit nor did my scheduling useless ability. Chit happens. This COVID crap has put us all in a bind. Client I’m building farm house for asks every Friday, “how we looking”? Me: we are a week closer. I would pad your “schedule & roll w/it. The market is blazing here & subs are picking their cherries as well, but been there.

Mike
 

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It's very similar to having a custom item ordered, where fabrication and shipping from order time can be all over the place, and it could be damaged or misbuilt and have to be replaced. Your best guess us your best guess, and take it from there during execution.
 

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Any seasoned contractor knows schedules can be useless/stress traps.
I agree long-term scheduling of construction events, particularly residential, is pretty much a best guess process. I do schedules for my new homes in Builder Trend, no way I can schedule 10-14 months out, but I do create a schedule. It's a big guesstimate. But for short-term scheduling a few weeks out, I do try to schedule critical path processes. I do this by using purchase orders for subs and putting hard dates for completion of their work. I communicate to them that part of our agreement, not just money and specs, is timely completion. Does this work perfectly? No, but it has improved my scheduling and we make it part of our building process.
 

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Custom
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The best laid plans of mice and men... Communication is key... letting the clients know in advance before work even begins of the potential delays that can present themselves, both contractually and verbally/text, insulates you to a degree for when they do, as you can reference your conversations and contract...

That said, don't let it become a crutch... schedules only move if they're lubricated and pushed...
 

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No, don't arbitrarily add days.

Add/adjust as it becomes necessary.

Some things will be on time or ahead others will lag.

Just arbitrarily adding time on account of because, you will lose credibility and the schedule will mean less than it already does...

IME, schedules are no good before they are printed.
Also, if you add an arbitrary 10 days and the electricians know it, there is a good chance they will take those extra 10 days whether they need them or not.

Same with all the other trades.

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
 
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Kowboy
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I remember working with my father about 50 years back and a client asked him about the schedule, his response was "it will be done the day I finish".
Wish I could get away with that.
We had a two-sink kitchen replacement job today that we couldn't finish through no fault of our own. Got one done and the dishwasher working and the customer's saying that's not good enough, it has to be done for his upcoming party.

No it don't. You're not wrecking my schedule over your damned party. Ima channel Pounder's pa:

"It'll be done the day I finish."
 

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Mason
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My dad's line was too look at the customer with a real earnest face and swear "Don't worry, if it takes until next Christmas, we'll get it done!"

Of course, we'd be on a one week job in July at the time.
 
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