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Discussion Starter #1
About to build new in middle Tennessee. Top of hill, good drainage, no excessive moisture, crawl-space w/ Advantek sub-floor. Want to use wide plank wood (6-12"), prepared tongue and groove by a local sawmill, finished on site.

Want low-sheen rustic look. I'll be happy when it wears and ages (within reason). We have a 70-lb black Lab and we're not good about keeping her toenails trimmed!

I've been cautioned against using wood at all due to the dog and warned that the wide boards will "cup". Does anyone have experience living with this type of floor? What's my best bet for wood type and finish? If I have the wood quarter-sawn will that reduce cupping? Our budget is moderate. Thank you.
 

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Flooring Guru
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look for a wide plank in an engineered wood.

The Biltmore Estate collection by anderson is some of the best I have seen.
And more stable too.

Kahrs is also out with a handscraped collection. Engineered wood and very stable.
 

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True quarter sawn should not move around very much but this pretty much limits you to 3 planks per log in wide stock, pretty expensive. Flat sawn is the most notorious for cupping.
I'm hoping that your mill has experience in this, you don't want to lay a green floor. The slabs should be cut and ricked until the moisture content is down to about 20%, basically think about one year per inch of thickness. The ends should be sealed with wax to prevent splitting. You can now close mill.
I'm betting that you thought that this was going to happen fast, done right, it's not. Get back when the wood is seasoned, also allow for about 50% loss. Some planks will split and you will have loss on install.

Flor slid in with good advice, you may want to consider it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Is engineered different than laminates? I REALLY want to use real, solid wood. I thought it could be kiln-dried to speed the process. What about pine planks, how bad would that cup? I know pine is soft but I want a distressed floor.
 

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You're going to have to search your area for kiln drying, that will speed things up at an additional cost.
May I make the assumption that you are a transplant to TN?
 

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when I hear laminate I think of "plasic laminate" like Pergo.

A good engineered floor will be made up of layers and the top layer should be nice and thick so it can be sanded a few times if needed. It is technically laminated, but we will call it engineered hardwood.
 
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