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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I generally pre-prime my stock with BIN. I’ve been finding that the poplar really soaks it in and fuzzes up so much, it usually needs a second coat after I sand. I try to avoid using BIN inside (once the trim is installed), so I’m basically afraid to sand poplar after installation.

I still sand the pine after priming, but I generally only need to sand very lightly, just once to get good results.

I think I’m also done with proclassic hybrid. It runs more than Forrest Gump. I’ve been having way better luck with emerald urethane enamel.

Leo, are you saying you’re doing painted trim in Maple? Or were you referring to cabinetry? I’d love the budget to do maple as paint grade trim.
 

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Water based primer on poplar raises the grain too much it's horrible. As for Proclassic hybrid I haven't used it in years since I left SW but it running is what allowed it to lay down to a smooth finish it's closest to oil than any water based I ever used. Most of my painting career has been working with oil, love a good oil. It's a shame SW become so incompetent in my area I couldn't take it any longer.
 

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I generally pre-prime my stock with BIN. I’ve been finding that the poplar really soaks it in and fuzzes up so much, it usually needs a second coat after I sand. I try to avoid using BIN inside (once the trim is installed), so I’m basically afraid to sand poplar after installation.

I still sand the pine after priming, but I generally only need to sand very lightly, just once to get good results.

I think I’m also done with proclassic hybrid. It runs more than Forrest Gump. I’ve been having way better luck with emerald urethane enamel.

Leo, are you saying you’re doing painted trim in Maple? Or were you referring to cabinetry? I’d love the budget to do maple as paint grade trim.
Mostly cabinetry. If it's painted and it's trim on a wall I almost always use Poplar. Easier to mill and easier to cut in the field. For the most part if I'm bringing trim into a house it's either pre primed by me or pre finished so it's all done in the shop. If it's primer I usually do 2 coats, 1st quick coat and then scuffed and a 2nd coat which has confused clients as paint it's so smooth. I always told them to scuff it so your paint binds well to it.
 

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Maple. Usually I can get away with only sanding it to 150 the 1st round. But when I make doors sometimes I drop to 100 grit to get the joints down flush quickly and then I have to do 150 later on. And usually the doors and the face frames get 120 and then sit while I build the boxes and then get sanded 150 right before finishing. Then they get primed and scuffed with 320 and the color coat gets scuffed with 320 and then the final coat.
I swung by the big box store and picked up a 1x6-8' poplar. That one board worked out to over $10.00 Bd Ft. The last time I bought soft maple a few months ago, I paid less than $5.00 BD Ft of 4/4 s2s select. I remember the $5.00 because I complained of the price.
 

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I paid $4/BF for Poplar wholesale for 250 BF Last time I bought it I paid $2.39
 

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Have 15,550 bd ft of 4/4 FAS being delivered Monday at $2.45/ bdft. So far this supplier has been excellent. Hopefully this will tide us over long enough till prices come down again.
 
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