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Doing a finished basement refurb thing, and the home owner wanted us to cover the panel box, enclose, etc. No problem there! She said close it up, make it nice, and I will hang a picture over the opening so we can get to it, etc.. My co-worker (equal in rank to me) wanted me to make a enclosure that could be un-screwed if and when needed to get to the cover of the panel/cable/phone/plug, etc. just big enough to open the door for the breakers! So I made a cover, left everything open and able to get at, and I said "they need to buy a bigger picture!" HE was P$$&d at me! I said things need to be able to get at, code reason, common sense reason, and for a resale type issue with a inspection later. Now for the question here! Is there a code for this, I am not a electrician, so the code thing is not me. Just looking out for others! And trying to learn a thing or two! AND the home-owner was PLEASED!!
Please let me know if I did good! LOL
dave
 

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I own stock in FotoMat!
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You need to make it large enough to remove the cover and access the panel interior, not just open the door to reset the breakers.

FAIL:

 

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I own stock in FotoMat!
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Please explain the "PERIOD" part.
Here a panel has to be accessible, can be covered with doors etc, no screw on covers. I usually leave 1' open all around panel and cover it with an easily opened door/doors and also make the door easy to remove.
I can't count the panels I've seen boxed in, then a simple cabinet door placed over it to hide it. Open the hinged door, and the panel is fully accessible. Perfectly legal.
 

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Hair Splitter
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Against code to cover a panel ..PERIOD!
Not around here...so no period.

Like Sparky said as long as you can access the entire panel (remove the cover), you are within code.
 

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If you cant remove the panel cover, it is a code violation.

I've cut out plenty of "pretty looking woodwork" and more often drywall and casing to access panels on service calls in order to track down problems.

Further, if the home is sold and has a home inspection (which they usually do now) the inspector will not cut the panel out and will usually just red flag the whole panel as inaccessible and rely on us to provide a full report on the condition. (I had one just last week like this) Cha-ching!

PS Dave, you are 100 percent correct and your co-worker is 100 percent wrong.
 
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