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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm speccing this road to be paved. I have a rail road crossing though, and the cross is normal rail, with the rubber mats laid in there. so the driver transfers from asphalt, to the rubber & rails, then back to asphalt.

I'm putting a 3" lift of new surface on all of this...how do I avoid keeping my crossing from being bumpy? Do I need to pick up the rubber and add 3" asphalt (or something else) under it? stack more rubber on it? what do you guys suggest?
 

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Talk to the railroad engineers to find our what has worked well and is acceptable.

They have seen more of there situations than you have.
 

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The Old Master
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Interesting ... How much space is there from edge of asphalt to edge of rubber mat? I would assume at least 6-7" As it is now the tire would leave asphalt, cross rail and then go onto rubber mat and again 3' later (roughly) ... Now you talk about raising rubber 3" . Now the tire will not have the rail to ride on. (unless you raise the rail) BUMP - BUMP! and BUMP - BUMP! Again!
Seems to me like these specs should call for a mill job at the crossing of 3" then gradually the paving can be brought up to the new cap.
That should satisfy the driving public and the railroad. Of course I am just a plumber. Sanitary Engineer ...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Heh, the railroad is technically plant property, so I don't think it's a conventional question. The last plant engineer to have dealt with this would have been several decades ago.

I was hoping a paving contractor had paved over such a crossing before, and could tell me how they handled it
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I believe it's asphalt all the way up mat, and it's fairly level with little space.

I had considered just trimming my resurface down low at that point, just sloping it down to the crossing, and then after the crossing sloping back up to 3" to avoid making ANY changes to the railroad, while keeping things smooth.
 

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It's our property to move. Trust me. I'm just trying to find the best solution.
My reply was written before you posted that this was a private siding (or whatever) on a plant. I apologize, but I am the Anti-wingnut. And Wingnut engineers are not unheard of. The suggestions to ask the RR does sound good, you don't want to f**k up the train, no matter who's property it is on. Derail the train, and your boss will be screaming at you "why didn't you listen to Anti-wingnut!!!!!!!!!!!!!!".
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I understand, and you are correct. I need to see who has authority over it and throw my thoughts by them.

I just figured someone had paved across one before at some point, and maybe would have some insight.
 
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