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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone ever used a primed finger jointed trim called Paulownia. I believe it goes by E-Prime. Just came across it at a suppliers. I have to get a sample. Thinking about using it for interior trim. Otherwise I stick with poplar. I'd like to hear if anyone has ever used it and what they thought about it. Is it really soft? It sounds slightly shady. Thanks, Nick.
 

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I like it.....larger selection of thickness. I see it used a lot. No trouble so far. Paints up nice. I like how light it is as well.


:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:

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Mike
 

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It's soft and light, maybe halfway between poplar and balsa. Get a sample and bump an edge to see if it's hard enough for you or your application (crown is one thing, a door casing in a fine home another). Make a few cuts, too.

I'm sticking to poplar.
 

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It's soft and light, maybe halfway between poplar and balsa. Get a sample and bump an edge to see if it's hard enough for you or your application (crown is one thing, a door casing in a fine home another). Make a few cuts, too.

I'm sticking to poplar.
Good point.......it's not for traffic areas......the one inch stock is great for crown build outs and cabinet accents. Again....all up high.

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Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That was what I got from reading about it. Sounded softer than poplar. Cheaper though. How does it compare to pine for softness. I like the P5 primed pine. At the moment poplar is still the choice.
 

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Softer than pine. Pick some up and cut it.....work with it. You'll see right away it has it's place.... both interior and exterior.

I use it to build all my workstations and jigs. It's just so light.

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Maybe I get something different that we call paulownia, but what my supplier sells as paulownia is a finger joint primed cedar board available in 1x and 5/4x. It's much softer than the finger joint primed pine. I think it's a good option for trimming exteriors when PVC is not in the budget. Still need to seal all cut edges though.
 

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Checked out E-Prime. Stuff is made from Paulownia, which has a long history in Asia.

Fine grained and light, supposedly warp resistant and, to a certain extent ... insect resistant.

They are now using it for electric guitars and light touring skis.

Here's a link (apologize for it being Wikipedia, as that is not considered a reliable source). But, here it is any way .....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paulownia

Sounds like something that we may try ... You never know 'til you give 'er a whirl.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I may give some a try on closet baseboard and door casing. It is cheaper than the poplar, but being so soft is not a plus in my book
 

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Lanya LaPunta said:
Checked out E-Prime. Stuff is made from Paulownia, which has a long history in Asia. Fine grained and light, supposedly warp resistant and, to a certain extent ... insect resistant. They are now using it for electric guitars and light touring skis. Here's a link (apologize for it being Wikipedia, as that is not considered a reliable source). But, here it is any way ..... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paulownia Sounds like something that we may try ... You never know 'til you give 'er a whirl.
Thanks for that link, very informative. I honestly didn't know paulownia was a type of wood, just thought it was a trade name given to finger joint cedar. The look and feel and smell reminds me of cedar. I don't think I'd ever use it interior and especially not baseboard. I think it's too soft.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well, I've been using it on closet casing and baseboard. In my opinion it is junk. Extremely soft, which I expected, but the edges are rounded over which makes joinery a bit difficult on anything other than a miter. The paint job on this stuff is also pretty bad. Super thin. It is nice to carry around 10- 1x4x16's at once though. Glad I am only using it closets. I've got a piece sitting outside in the weather in the ground to see how it does.
 

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Well, I've been using it on closet casing and baseboard. In my opinion it is junk. Extremely soft, which I expected, but the edges are rounded over which makes joinery a bit difficult on anything other than a miter. The paint job on this stuff is also pretty bad. Super thin. It is nice to carry around 10- 1x4x16's at once though. Glad I am only using it closets. I've got a piece sitting outside in the weather in the ground to see how it does.
I think the name suggests it should stay in the closet.
Just say in'

Cheers, Jim
 

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I used it quite a bit in the cabinet shop building furniture and cabinets.Nice wood to work with and looks really nice stained.Don't think I'd use it for case work.To soft .
It is a member of the Catalpa family and one of the fastest growing trees there is.Some will grow 15'- 20' in a year.Georgia Pacific has some plantations growing paulownia to make osb from.
 

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Well, I've been using it on closet casing and baseboard. In my opinion it is junk. Extremely soft, which I expected, but the edges are rounded over which makes joinery a bit difficult on anything other than a miter. The paint job on this stuff is also pretty bad. Super thin. It is nice to carry around 10- 1x4x16's at once though. Glad I am only using it closets. I've got a piece sitting outside in the weather in the ground to see how it does.
You can blame the wood for being soft. You can blame the wood for being difficult with which to work.

However, you cannot blame the wood for the thinness of the stock or the fact that the edges are rounded.

That is solely the fault of the mill.

I like the stuff. Takes a gorgeous stain ... showing relatively decent grain. Moreover, we've had no problems.

You're simply working with a shoddy quality mill ... or at least not up to your specs and/or requirements.
 
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