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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a interesting situation, a customer refuse to give me my last draw on a project that consists of making trenches in walls, mouse holes in walls, tearing studs out walls,etc.

He tell's me that I am responsible for the walls repairs.

In my contract I don't even address this nor did we even discuss this on contract signing. For fifteen years I never had this dilema it just always seem like a no-brainer between us and the customer.

So I was just wondering do any EC. automatically repairs wall and includes it in there bid.
 

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Thom
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If you are contracting directly with a HO, you need to include everything. If you have sales tax, show it. If the HO needs to make decisions, show it. If you are not doing absolutely everything, including walking the dog, you better show that to.

As a GC I would not expect an electrician to do this but looking the other direction, my contracts with HO's left zero to the imagination.

Good fences (and contracts) make good neighbors.
 
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I always spell these issues out as carefully as practicable on my proposals. It looks like you have an issue if it isn't in writing. I will go as far as replacing the cut out drywall, taping, corner bead, and the first coat of mud. I believe that is going further than what is customary. After that, they are on their own. :thumbsup:
 

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Who did you think was going to fix all the drywall? Did you mention anything to the HO about that before you started. Hope this works out for you but it does'nt sound good.:sad:

I normally end my proposals with ______________ by others.​
 

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Philadelphia electrician
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I always used to do my own patching - they hired me to improve their house, not wreck it - and included it in my costs and their price, but never mentioned it either way.
I finally decided it was uneconomical for my customers to pay my rates for me to plaster and spackle [which I am a fair dab hand at!]. It was going to be a partial rewire in an old plaster direct on stone colonial.
I no longer fix anything but electrical.
I say I don't fix anything but electrical.
I have it written in my proposal that I don't fix anything but electrical and that repair of any hole, channel, etc. is to be made by others by arrangement of the customer and is the complete responsibility of the customer at their expense.
...and I get written acceptance of the terms and conditions.

Here, the common practice is rough patch restoration of surfaces and replacement [read as reinstallation] of any trim or surfaces removed. You can always agree to do the work but advise that there is a charge for it, as it wasn't included.
Completed fine finish and painting is always up to the customer.

If you have a contract, since you probably wrote it, it will be interpreted in the most favorable light of the homeowner. Without a written agreement regarding the point, I suppose you will have to prove what the local industry standard practice is and be happy with that, or face paying the cost of restoration.

Sounds like time to lawyer up!
...and do you need the bad press this will garner?
 

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I always let my customers know that I don't do drywall repairs. By that I mean, I won't tape (unless it's really small). I'll replace the piece I had to remove, but they'll have to contact another trade/handiman to finish. If they're not comfortable with that, I don't do the job. Hopefully this job won't turn into a nightmare for you... pete
 

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Patch

We usually just respackle around studs after were done and they can take it from there. I usually have a good conversation and feel them out for what they want us to do. I let them know were electricians and not drywallers. Some people really want to save money so I tell them it would be much cheaper if they or their drywaller can finish the rest and here is what we are going to notch and the size of the holes. If they want us to do it then I charge for my drywaller to come out and complete and of course add my 30% on top of that. 90% of our custormers say they can take it from spackle on and that's it. I don't touch textured ceilings though or even sub it out. bad things can happen there.
 

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Head Grunt
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As others have stated this should be part of the negotiating when estimating the job or at least spoken about before work is done. I myself will patch drywall but if the job gets to big then i give them the option of me subbing it out or they get thier own sub. As bubbles stated be careful of textured walls/ceiling, that crap sucks!!! I would like to know what kind of job was this that you had to rip out so much drywall? Very rarely do i ever have to tear out drywall, my motto is if there is a will then there is a way.
 

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I own stock in FotoMat!
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.........I myself will patch drywall but if the job gets to big then i give them the option of me subbing it out or they get thier own sub. ............
I do my own minor patches as well, but I never give the customer much choice other than me, or my drywaller. I know for a fact how good my drywaller is. Not so with the HO's second-cousin's boss's next-door-neighor's paperboy's teacher's brother.
 

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I go to great length with a client to explain the possible damage to their home before contracting for the work. Some clients decide against having the work done because of the holes requires to run the wiring. I used to do patching. I don't do patches any more because a client complained about my patching skills (or lack of). I have wording included in the contract regarding patching. IMO this was a poor assumption/communication on your part so you get to deal with the client and loss of final payment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
(IMO this was a poor assumption/communication on your part so you get to deal with the client and loss of final payment.)

Well Tiger I was not expecting you to come and talk to my customer, so of course I am going to deal with my customer.

In response to the carpentar that ask who I think should repair the holes,and walls. Well he call me out of the phonebook and was looking for an electrician ,so likewise go to the phonebook look for a finish carpentar.

The task that I was hire to do was: Move the panel that is reccessed to the opposite wall reccessed in, run six (6) branch circuits in non-metallic(romex) 2-storys. Customer did not want piping on the exterior walls.
 

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(IMO this was a poor assumption/communication on your part so you get to deal with the client and loss of final payment.)

Well Tiger I was not expecting you to come and talk to my customer, so of course I am going to deal with my customer.

In response to the carpentar that ask who I think should repair the holes,and walls. Well he call me out of the phonebook and was looking for an electrician ,so likewise go to the phonebook look for a finish carpentar.

The task that I was hire to do was: Move the panel that is reccessed to the opposite wall reccessed in, run six (6) branch circuits in non-metallic(romex) 2-storys. Customer did not want piping on the exterior walls.

Just a suggestion here:

Explain to the customer that it was not included and is not customary for the electrician to finish drywall. Then, offer to make it "right" since it was not spelled out in the beginning. Either do the work yourself, if you feel comfortable doing so, or hire a pro to do it. Satisfy the customer and treat it as a learning experience. Just my 2 cents.

I'm with RobertWilbur on the economics of these situations. I can/have patched drywall (smooth not textured) so that the repair is undetctable. But, I know a pro painter/drywaller that charges 1/3 of what I charge per hour and he is at least twice as fast.
 

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Homeowners can be morons, but I've realized that I can be an even bigger moron. I recently took a time and material job (first mistake) on a painting job. The reason was that she had inheireted a house and was trying to flip it, and she began with painting all over the place. Some rooms were half finished, and she had done patching that she needed me to sand. She was also doing ridiculous things like painting the grooves in wood paneling to create a pinstripe effect, and she hadn't made up her mind on what to do where. It would've been an estimating nightmare, and since it's been slow I figured it was better than nothing just to get some good wages in.

The lady then had us start working on various electrical issues around the house as well. Then we pulled some rotten moulding in the bathroom. Then she decides that she wants new door hardware, and we have to bore all the doors to modern dimensions. We then fixed a plumbing leak at her water heater which subsequently forced us to replace the main shut off valve to her house when it broke in the process of shutting down the water. All of our hours were clearly posted at her location, and then one day she decides that she's going over budget and says she can't afford us anymore.

So here's the fun part: she then claims, "Well you can't just leave all this painting and trim half finished!" I told her, "This was a time and material job. I clearly said at the beginning that if it starts to get too expensive, we'll stop work and let you finish out." This client however was completely unreasonable, and began to become bullish. I could see this was getting ugly, and I really don't need a legal battle or a bad review on our lead website, therefore we opted to throw in 12 man hours to finish the more skill intensive projects we started. After all this, she still had the nerve to put a stop order on the final check (remember, I gave away 12 hours) because we left her a few walls to roll out, which also cost us additional banking fees. So now we're filing a lien and hoping that someday we'll get paid if we don't have to fight her in court.

Moral of the story: make your contracts air tight and be clear and assertive with your customers. The second you back down or show weakness, they get a gut feeling that they're right, no matter how wrong they truly are. I wish I could blacklist her to warn future contractors, as I witnessed her try to beat up every specialty contractor that came through that house.
 
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