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"Buy Quality, Cry Once"
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I have a huge historic interior coming up. The home is all plaster. There are some hairline cracks, can these be patched with spackle? Also there are some large area missing plaster, Im not all together sure how to fix this. Oh, and as an aside whats a good wallpaper steamer for removing wallpaper, I went through two wagners todays what a piece of crap.
 

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Hairline cracks

My first thought is to have a plaster guy come in since you stated there are "large" areas missing in the plaster. He could fix both.
Brenda
 

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Phew!!!
 

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May I suggest to you that.....Whatever you decided to do you should advise your client that minor hairline cracks are susceptible to future cracks due to shifting in the walls or foundation.

Someone from this network sent me a copy of his residential contract so I could review. The contract was brilliant as it had a clause or statement in it that suggested repair to cracks are susceptible to future cracks due to what I mentioned above. I now use this line in my contract....it educates the client and eliminates the need to return in 12 months for the repair.

I have a house with plaster walls and fill the cracks with spackle. The cracks always come back after 12 months. The cracks are really too small to put drywall tape and compound. But if your cracks in this house are 2/8 to 1/4 wide, you should use drywall tape and compound.

Just my thoughts

Zeebo
 

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Good idea about the contract.
I tell my customers up front that there is no guarantee on the cracks.
In reference to dry wall tape being used to repair "stress cracks", I too have plaster in my home; I repaired by scrapping out the crack and patched with the meshed tape and mud at least 5 years ago with no return of the crack.
Brenda
 

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So what does the elastromeric caulking do? Allow for more movement?
What other uses are there for this type of caulk?
Brenda
 

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Those cracks are due to the wood lathe that most (old) plaster is put up with. The wood expands and contracts due to moisture and causes the "keys" of plaster to let go...hence the cracking. Some are due to stress or settling of the home, but on older homes, this is usually the reason. Only way to remedy for good is to drywall over the plaster...

Usually as a fix for customers we use a lightweight spackle hairline cracks, but like others have said, no guarantees.
 

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What AAPaint said is on the money and you can add heat and cold. The issue in my mind having done a lot of historic restoration, is this "restoration" or just a fix it up job? Some restorations require you to make it true to itself, plaster to plaster! Sometimes the reason for the cracks reappearing is that you really need to "match" the plaster. Old lime and horsehair was really crappy plaster and if you patch with todays stuff which is much better and dos'nt need horse hair to hold it together, it is stronger so when the shifting happens again, it will crack again. Is this "historic interior" a landmark or part of the National historical registry? Or just old plaster?
 

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Exroadog said:
What AAPaint said is on the money and you can add heat and cold. The issue in my mind having done a lot of historic restoration, is this "restoration" or just a fix it up job? Some restorations require you to make it true to itself, plaster to plaster! Sometimes the reason for the cracks reappearing is that you really need to "match" the plaster. Old lime and horsehair was really crappy plaster and if you patch with todays stuff which is much better and dos'nt need horse hair to hold it together, it is stronger so when the shifting happens again, it will crack again. Is this "historic interior" a landmark or part of the National historical registry? Or just old plaster?
Well said. I didn't touch on the restoration or fix 'er up 'er part. Of course, totally different ball games. A lot of good suggestions in this thread though depending on which direction you're customer's budget allows you to go.... :Thumbs:
 

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:Thumbs: To Brenda.

Here we go again with boat products. BoatLife has products that WILL stick to teak and will last longer than anything in plaster cracking situations. Going back with plaster could crack tomorrow, this stuff is elastomeric and comes in different viscosities for thin or thick cracks. Be careful of what you buy. An educated guy with a plastic spreader will give you the best results. Large cracks may take 2 applications to be invisible. Expect sheen changes prior to primer application. Once primer is applied, anything can be used for touchup.
 

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Brenda, I never posted that before. Boat stuff is expensive and most don't want to deal with that. I'm expensive and make every attempt to do a job to the best of my abilities, I also have a business in the marine industry and have knowledge of these materials. I cross them over often.

A tube of painters caulk will cost you $1.50, a tube of marine caulk can cost $11+, BIG difference. The BIGGER difference is that the 'painters or tub and tile caulk' will seperate over the years, boat caulk expands and contracts better and may loosen the tiles from the wall before giving up the seal thus saving the structure from water damage.
 
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