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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, we are about two weeks behind schedule but we are finally starting on monday. Should be a fun one. It will be the first radius stairs i've done so that will be interesting. I'll try to keep up better with the pics this time.

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Are you hoping for 4 weeks or less?
I've done a few very similar to that, and two of them, we couldn't use our fork-lift on. They were a battle.
Anyhow, I hope it runs smooth for you and the crew.
 

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Most times on stairs like that, they are built off site and installed by us. I have framed 3 sets like that so if you need any tips feel free to PM me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
We are hoping less than 4 weeks yes. Probably more like 3 but we'll see. I haven't seen the engineered drawings yet so that will determine a lot for me.
I have a lot of ideas about the stairs but need to confirm the finish/ trim with the expediter. Thanks for the offer Warren i might have to take you up on it
 

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We are hoping less than 4 weeks yes. Probably more like 3 but we'll see. I haven't seen the engineered drawings yet so that will determine a lot for me.
I have a lot of ideas about the stairs but need to confirm the finish/ trim with the expediter. Thanks for the offer Warren i might have to take you up on it
The one we built that can most relate to this, took us around 5 weeks(8 guys). It also had a difficult deck in the back with 2 levels and a partial roof.

I assume that's a radius balloon-wall in the back. Would you erect that any different from normal? Plus, it looks like a time consuming sunken floor in the Great room.

No matter what... you have a plate full. I would hope it's not a 100 mile or more round trip everyday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
FRAME2FINISH said:
They build those mansions in a week on the home giveaway show!!!!
Dont even get started on those atrocities. How long would it take you?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
ObuckiO said:
The one we built that can most relate to this, took us around 5 weeks(8 guys). It also had a difficult deck in the back with 2 levels and a partial roof.

I assume that's a radius balloon-wall in the back. Would you erect that any different from normal? Plus, it looks like a time consuming sunken floor in the Great room.

No matter what... you have a plate full. I would hope it's not a 100 mile or more round trip everyday.
Its only a 40 mile round trip but its all back roads so it takes around 45 min to get there with my box truck

The great room is a double stepped ceiling not a floor. That would definitely take a while! As for the back wall, i will probably just build that on the ground and tip it all up at once. It will be a little time consuming but worth it
 

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Haha I take 3 weeks to do one with angles but they pay my price or I don't do it!!!

Yea that show kills me with the crap they edit out, but the lay people don't catch it like builders do!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It was an interesting first day to say the least. We started late because of a bunch of catching up that had to be done at the office so we didnt make much progress. The semi that was moving our lift broke down and then when they got it fixed and went to move the lift, the starter fried on the lift. So no lift to start the job. At least the lumber company spread the material nicely for us. After work i went to change the starter and finally got that done about two hours ago. What a day!

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Your going to need to get the curved balcony details better defined than what shows up on the print you posted. It looks like a carpet balcony, & I would assume the curved stairs are open hardwood treads. The transition from hardwood to carpet at the top can be a bit sticky due to everyone not being on the same page as to how it gets executed. Some just carpet wrap a nose that's flush with the ply/osb. Some butt the carpet to the railing bullnose edging, much to the dismay of some building inspectors. Personally, I like the look of butting it, but it needs to have a wood filler, maybe 3'to 6", instead of foam pad at the nosing area, so as not to create a tripping hazzard.

The other thing I wonder about is that it's drawn as a continuous over the top rail from the curve stairs around to the 90 deg corner. That's a long way to go without a newel post. I'd put one at the top of the stairs at the curve miter, & again at the other end of the balcony curve, for a total of three across the balcony.

Looks like fun!
Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Railman said:
Your going to need to get the curved balcony details better defined than what shows up on the print you posted. It looks like a carpet balcony, & I would assume the curved stairs are open hardwood treads. The transition from hardwood to carpet at the top can be a bit sticky due to everyone not being on the same page as to how it gets executed. Some just carpet wrap a nose that's flush with the ply/osb. Some butt the carpet to the railing bullnose edging, much to the dismay of some building inspectors. Personally, I like the look of butting it, but it needs to have a wood filler, maybe 3'to 6", instead of foam pad at the nosing area, so as not to create a tripping hazzard.

The other thing I wonder about is that it's drawn as a continuous over the top rail from the curve stairs around to the 90 deg corner. That's a long way to go without a newel post. I'd put one at the top of the stairs at the curve miter, & again at the other end of the balcony curve, for a total of three across the balcony.

Looks like fun!
Joe
The stairs are going to be carpet so all i have to worry about is the first floor flooring. As for the railing that is up to the designers and finishers, all we do is frame.

We're about an hour away from sheathing the deck. I only took one pic yesterday but you can see some of the framing. Still need to do squash blocks and finish part of the stair hole. Its hard to see but thats a seven ply LVL bolted together. The thing that really grinds my gears is that alot of builders around here have the frame just sitting on top of the steel beams. It makes it pretty difficult to keep everything straight and in line

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It's good you have area to maneuver the fork-lift around though. Plus, for being a parade, it doesn't seem that congested either.

I assume you are saying most don't top plate the steal? I've never seen that and could imagine the hassle. One other thing I noticed(not a big difference), I've never seen all the rim board put on before the joists. I could see some advantage either way.

Anyhow, Now the fun part starts... Good Luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
ObuckiO said:
It's good you have area to maneuver the fork-lift around though. Plus, for being a parade, it doesn't seem that congested either.

I assume you are saying most don't top plate the steal? I've never seen that and could imagine the hassle. One other thing I noticed(not a big difference), I've never seen all the rim board put on before the joists. I could see some advantage either way.

Anyhow, Now the fun part starts... Good Luck.
Yep we have plenty of room thats for sure. Normally we dont put all the rim on but since almost none of the joists are full span, it didnt matter. The lumber yard sent out a huge pile of joists but no cut list so i needed time to figure it all out. This is what our joist layout looks like

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Normally we get a nice engineered layout but this lumber guy does things his own way i guess
 

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So with no beam plate and spliced joists, how are you doing the splices? Just the squash blocks?
 

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... After work i went to change the starter and finally got that done about two hours ago. What a day!
I don't think there's anything I hate more than having to play mechanic on a piece of equipment at the end of a day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
kiteman said:
So with no beam plate and spliced joists, how are you doing the splices? Just the squash blocks?
Yes. The install requires either solid joist blocking, or squash blocking. We choose squash blocking so the mechanical guys dont smash out all the panels. We just eyeball every thing straight and verify header placement before we cap it and then pull 16's as we go
 

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Sounds like a plan. So what does anchor the free ends of the beams? It does seem to me to have some squeak potential. I've heard of it being done though.

I usually temp mine up on wood posts so I can brace them off the sill plate and set a little faster, then put in the columns after the joists are run. Something I learned when we had a boom truck setting steel to get him out quicker. Then I can fook around getting the columns set and leveled when everything is fixed and the guys are decking. My hearing is already wrecked, so I won't damage their ears when I'm banging on a post.

What, you don't trust the lines on the decking?:laughing:
 

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Normally we dont put all the rim on but since almost none of the joists are full span, it didnt matter. The lumber yard sent out a huge pile of joists but no cut list so i needed time to figure it all out. This is what our joist layout looks like
Good point(on the rim).

Yeah, every now and then we'd get a pile of joists to cut the puzzle pieces out of. It was time consuming. Sometimes we would cut and use the part that had its identifying mark on it and lose track of what the remainder was for. (especially if it read 3 different joists out of 1 long one).

Anyhow, 1st floor walls has always been a favorite stage I like to be on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
kiteman said:
Sounds like a plan. So what does anchor the free ends of the beams? It does seem to me to have some squeak potential. I've heard of it being done though.

I usually temp mine up on wood posts so I can brace them off the sill plate and set a little faster, then put in the columns after the joists are run. Something I learned when we had a boom truck setting steel to get him out quicker. Then I can fook around getting the columns set and leveled when everything is fixed and the guys are decking. My hearing is already wrecked, so I won't damage their ears when I'm banging on a post.

What, you don't trust the lines on the decking?:laughing:
The beams are subbed out to a steel company and they fab and set them. If it were up to me, we would do it. At least it would be right, or our fault if it was wrong! The residential market has been flooded up here with steel companies that have no commercial work. Its sad because it forced a large exclusively residential company, that was good at it, out of buisness
 
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