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I have a project coming up where I have to paint a house which was sided some years ago with LP smartside pre primed siding and then just left hanging for some years. Don't know how long; just guessing 15 years? Anyway, the siding and the factory primer appear to be in good shape. No chalking or chipping.

It was very dirty, so I pressure washed it a few weeks ago and now I'm ready to paint.

Kind of wondering about re-priming. Several people have suggested I should; perhaps the old primer has lost its grip. I took a rag wet with acetone to a scrap and the primer didn't come off (suspect it is some sort of baked on finish anyway.)

And if I do reprime, do I use oil or latex. The topcoat will be latex.

Any advice you fellows could give me would be appreciated. I do a lot of interior painting, but not a lot of exterior stuff.
 

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The pressure washing you did (if thorough) scratches the surface at a microscopic level, providing "tooth" for the final coat to adhere.
 

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If you power wash first and there is no visible issues with the siding I would just paint it using SW Duration. It always makes sense to test an area first.

We started using Duration on all our exterior projects years ago. It's a bit pricey but will bond great to almost any clean, unprimed surface including raw wood and aluminum windows.

Most paint shops will almost always recommend you prime first because it sells more product and limits their liability.

We paint 50+ exteriors each season and use Duration on 95% of them. We've yet to encounter any instances where the Duration paint has failed.

I'm really not a sales rep for SW, I just appreciate good paint.
 

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You may have adhesion issues if you don't reprime it. Primer will start to deteriorate if left too long. Then use 2 coats finish. I use Pratt & Lambert Accolade. I wouldn't use Duration or any other paint over raw wood, always use primer. I would use any high quality latex primer, not oil unless it was raw wood.

LP recommends repriming if not painted within 180 days.
 

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I agree that primer DOES deteriorate after a said time, that's a fact.

What's also a fact is what I posted above.
 

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You may have adhesion issues if you don't reprime it. Primer will start to deteriorate if left too long. Then use 2 coats finish. I use Pratt & Lambert Accolade. I wouldn't use Duration or any other paint over raw wood, always use primer. I would use any high quality latex primer, not oil unless it was raw wood.

LP recommends repriming if not painted within 180 days.
Have you tried Duration? Would you explain why you wouldn't use Duration over raw wood? Would you explain why it's important to use oil primer on raw wood and not latex in 2014?

Just because you yourself never tried it or are you just repeating what your sales rep told you?

I suggest you try Duration or at least research it before you say never.

There are many new products that have eliminated old practices.
Oil is getting closer and closer to extinction, then what?
 

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Caslon said:
I agree that primer DOES deteriorate after a said time, that's a fact.

What's also a fact is what I posted above.
Here's another fact.

UV light destroys a primer's "adhesion" properties, especially after 15 years.

If you would guarantee the paint job for 5 years after your pressure washing, you're a better man than I.

I'd prime again.
 

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Grateful_Monk said:
Have you tried Duration? Would you explain why you wouldn't use Duration over raw wood? Would you explain why it's important to use oil primer on raw wood and not latex in 2014?

Just because you yourself never tried it or are you just repeating what your sales rep told you?

I suggest you try Duration or at least research it before you say never.

There are many new products that have eliminated old practices.
Oil is getting closer and closer to extinction, then what?
Shellac based paints.
 

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Have you tried Duration? Would you explain why you wouldn't use Duration over raw wood? Would you explain why it's important to use oil primer on raw wood and not latex in 2014?

Just because you yourself never tried it or are you just repeating what your sales rep told you?

I suggest you try Duration or at least research it before you say never.

There are many new products that have eliminated old practices.
Oil is getting closer and closer to extinction, then what?
Oil base primer out performs water base primer for exterior raw wood. I will only use water base as a spot primer. The same people at SW that are saying it's okay to use Duration as a primer should also be telling you that oil base primer is better. Just because it's 2014 doesn't make a product better than what was produced in 1970.

I have used Duration and used it exclusively for exteriors until they reformulated it.

When oil becomes extinct I will use water based primers but never self priming paints as primers.
 

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Stop freaking freaking out about old primer. Oh! SO IT'S GONNA REPEL PAINT? Gimme a break! A good waterblast will scratch the surface just fine. You ppl are paranoid or something. Would I bet my life that a good top coat will adhere for 7 years? I'd bet my life! What do you have to offer as a bet? I'd bet my life over you having your balls snipped off.

Any takers?
 

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Stop freaking freaking out about old primer. Oh! SO IT'S GONNA REPEL PAINT? Gimme a break! A good waterblast will scratch the surface just fine. You ppl are paranoid or something. Would I bet my life that a good top coat will adhere for 7 years? I'd bet my life! What do you have to offer as a bet? I'd bet my life over you having your balls snipped off.

Any takers?
I agree and I add to the poster.

Duration is widely excepted and trusted by many professional painting contractors as a high quality self-priming paint.

I wouldn't bet my life on anything but I'll toss in my 40' aluminum extension and a sprayer.
 

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Caslon said:
Stop freaking freaking out about old primer. Oh! SO IT'S GONNA REPEL PAINT? Gimme a break! A good waterblast will scratch the surface just fine. You ppl are paranoid or something. Would I bet my life that a good top coat will adhere for 7 years? I'd bet my life! What do you have to offer as a bet? I'd bet my life over you having your balls snipped off.

Any takers?
Good for you!

OP asked for opinions he got them.
 

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To the OP, contact LP they will tell you to reprime. I don't know what that does to the warranty, not painting it within 180 days. It comes with a 50 year warranty. So if you power wash, reprime at least that covers your ass.
 

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Impressive, that duration stuff sticks to vinyl huh? Have you tried that?
Yes, it sticks to almost any surface. Vinyl looks like brand new if you spray it with satin finish.

I just sprayed a steel storm door today with Duration that had a like new factory finish. Turned out bad ass, shocked my customer that previously thought it couldn't be painted. It was a nasty green color.

I do use masonry primer before painting raw brick although I don't think it would be a problem if you didn't. I only prime because SW recommends it. I just tint the primer as close to the finish color as possible and apply one coat of Duration. Looks beautiful.
 
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