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Well, I'm actually considering submitting some bids to paint new construction. The idea scares me a bit because I would have to rework my company quite a bit and add some employees, vans, and equipment... but the idea of consistent work is pretty nice.


Talk me out of it! :evil:
 

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ProWallGuy said:
Nathan, pm me about it, I just went through what you are about to do.
Could you guys please share on this one? I have recently been approached to do some as well, but I'm worried I'll just end up losing money on the deal....I know the rates are low in new construction. Anything you guys have to say, I'm all ears!
 

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AAPaint said:
Could you guys please share on this one? I have recently been approached to do some as well, but I'm worried I'll just end up losing money on the deal....I know the rates are low in new construction. Anything you guys have to say, I'm all ears!
Uhm me too...
 

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In a nutshell...........
I was trained to be a craftsman, with the artist's mentality.
I have done all my work like this, focusing on high-end repaints, niche work, like bizarre colors, designer work, etc. Not to mention wallpaper. We take our time and do a (if I may say so myself) superior job.
If this is you, new construction is not going to be your cup of tea.

On the other hand, if you are geared toward production, and are willing to do just basic paint jobs, forgetting about top quality, and just doing what it takes to pass by, then it will be fine.

I found the headaches and stress of dealing with
A. lowering my standards for work
B. having other trades botch your work on an ongoing basis
C. competing with all the REAL lowballers out there
D. profit margin way lower than custom repaints
E. etc etc etc
was not worth it to me.


Bear in mind, this is all MHO.
If you work with a get-in and get-out attitude, then new construction can
be a great source of steady work. This won't be jobs for $17 -$27 per hour guys. Its for crews making $8- $15 per hour.

Again, all my opinions, it just wasn't something I wanted to do. Could I make more money in the big picture? Probably. But I sleep better at night knowing I'm doing top quality work for people who appreciate the service that I offer.

Good luck in whatever you choose to do.
 

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AAPaint said:
Could you guys please share on this one? I have recently been approached to do some as well, but I'm worried I'll just end up losing money on the deal....I know the rates are low in new construction. Anything you guys have to say, I'm all ears!
If you choose to do this, do one or two to start, and see how it goes. don't get wrangled into a contract for multiple homes. If you lose $$ on one, you can run away. If you are stuck in a contract, you could really lose your a$$ big-time.

My tournament fishing partner owns a flooring company employing about 40 union floorlayers. They do all new construction. He is tight with a lot of homebuilders in my area. I asked him if he could get me an 'in' on some of the paint work. He said don't do it. On all these big home developments, he said he notices about every 3-4 weeks there is a new painting company doing the work. Either it is low ball work and the company lost its a$$ and bailed, or they just couldn't keep up.
 

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Seems all my fears were good instincts! I've worked in the new contstruction, just haven't bothered with it since I've been on my own, for those very reasons. It seemed like the only ones making money were the company owners....and I assume that was only due to volume. I'd have to take the "quality" out of my company name to do work the way they did.

It's nice to know my company name is getting around though because I was approached by a GC that got my card from somebody.....I don't even know who yet, heh! I think I'll continue to stick to custom repaints where the money is...Thanks for the input PWG! :Thumbs:
 

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I agree with several items.
You have to really be on the other trades, especially the tile/masons. The illegals like to go in and make a complete mess of the place with no regard to your work. The money is alittle lower, but for me my exterior season is strictly limited to May 1st to Oct 20th= it's snows the rest of the time, or is raining before it starts snowing. So for me the exterior and interior repaints in the summer months are hot, really hot for high dollar. Last week I restained a customers decks, railings and three story house in one day with one employee for 3,500 dollars. After all said and done I stand to make 3000 dollars :Thumbs:

But, on the other hand The winter time new construction with prefinish and everything else envolved is not nearly the same. I can still make roughly 35-45 percent on a job if I'm part of the crew. So long story short, yes people do low ball, but if I can have signed contracts for atleast 100K this winter and early spring I'm completely happy.
This allows me to work part time, make good money and be able to go skiing and snowmobiling atleast 3 days per week.

My advice is be carefull, take notes, itemize your bid, times and try atleast one home/condo, if it doesn't work out no harm no foul, or it might just fill a void in your off times

Peter

I'll post some photos of the recent little duplex we are about to complete. 1.4 millon per side- - pocket change for some of these home owners
 

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Another tip would be when you submit your bid, make sure to note the EXACT plan numbers/date of prints. This way if plans are amended, you are not stuck doing more than was originally thought, your proposal shows what you expected/bid for.

Bonus tip:
I know guys who get a lot of commercial work by being the lowest bidder. Not by lowballing, but effetively being the lowest bid by pricing by the exact specs they are given.
Most painters will look at specs, and charge for what needs to be done, and how they think it should be done. Don't do that, give a price for exactly what they want, no matter how stupid it sounds.
For example, the specs say one coat for walls. You know its going to take two to cover. So what, bid it for one, and make your money on the change order that follows for the second coat.
These guys have bid on big jobs, and come in under half of the competition. But when its said and done, the final price tag was higher than the highest bidder. But the low, specific bid got them the job.
 

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Nathan said:
Well, I'm actually considering submitting some bids to paint new construction. The idea scares me a bit because I would have to rework my company quite a bit and add some employees, vans, and equipment... but the idea of consistent work is pretty nice.


Talk me out of it! :evil:
I would like some input also please?
 
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