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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all. I am here from the HVAC side of things. I am currently having a good bit of clapboard siding (around 50%) replaced on an old victorian home. The existing siding is heart pine and we are replacing with cedar. I am starting to get real concerned about the knots bleeding through as there are a lot of them. The original plan was to use SW oil base primer and then top coat with SW Emerald or Resilience. Now I'm wondering if this is enough to prevent bleed through. We are planning on painting the house back white which isn't really helping my cause any. Have any of you successfully painted this type of cedar a light color without bleed through? Just trying to head off any problems in the future. There should be a picture attached.
 

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Goin' Down in Flames....
Highwayman
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I do a fair amount of cedar T&G siding, and I always prime front and back with an oil based primer.

I’m not familiar with SW products, as I don’t use them.

But I’ll use usually BIN 123.

Last one I did is white, and I’ve not had any problem with bleed through
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
We did not prime the back of the siding before it went up. I had planned to but my contractor just got ahead of me. Does priming the back help with preventing bleed through?
 

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We did not prime the back of the siding before it went up. I had planned to but my contractor just got ahead of me. Does priming the back help with preventing bleed through?
no, will not help with bleed through. it helps to keep the boards from cupping. Not a good move not to have had it primed. You using a rookie GC????

also you picked a heck of a grade of cedar to try and paint. seems like you bought a bunch of cedar knots connected by a little cedar lumber...

are you getting any pitch out of the knots now?

How dry is the cedar?

I do not use SW products either, but a good sealer like 7D said.
 

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Highwayman
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also you picked a heck of a grade of cedar to try and paint. seems like you bought a bunch of cedar knots connected by a little cedar lumber...
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:laughing:

Definitely a rustic look siding.

Usually that’ll get a varnish or transparent stain. Looks good like that, but not sure about paint.
 

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hopefully you used stainless steel nails?...:whistling
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
It is very knotty cedar I agree. The clear cedar just isn't available or at least not in a timely fashion. We did use stainless nails. Biggest mistake was not priming the back of the what small amount of cedar we have up. However the rest will be primed before it goes up I assure you. We are using oil mostly because of the original siding but hoping it will prevent bleed through on the cedar as well. We have been using SW A-100 on the window sashes and plan to use it on the siding as well. Thanks for taking the time to reply. I really appreciate it.
 

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As far as the knots a second coat would definitely do it. I would do a couple of test areas.
Prime a board or two with one coat of oil primer and let it dry.
On an adjacent board spot prime several knots, let dry 24 hours and then prime the board again entirely, this way the knots will have two coats on them.
After 24 hours compare the two areas and see if double coating the knots is beneficial, I think it would be.

Always let the oil primer dry 24 hours between coats, it makes a difference.
 

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I've used a lot of A-100 and it works well. Make sure you don't have pinholes in your prime coat. If the surface is rough, it can be tough.
 

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Stelzer Painting Inc.
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Knot the best siding for White

Lots of valuable info already given here. Definitely long oil prime, (not quick-dry oil). Will likely need to oil prime twice. The tannin will be blocked between 1st & 2nd coat of oil if you're lucky. Ohio Painter gave you a great tip about making sure to allow adequate dry time between primer coats. Follow it, or all your work will be for naught, and you'll have tannin bleed everywhere. Griz raised a valid concern as far as whether or not those knots are still exuding pitch. You'll have to address those first if they are. I stripped an old pine home a few years ago and had to treat the knots with Titebond II first, (brushed). Have cans of BIN shellac handy after all priming is done so you can spot-prime any stubborn stains, but don't use it on a larger scale than just spot-priming.

Be prepared to back-brush after you spray. No amount of paint applied by just spraying will make that grade of siding look good, especially if it's to be painted white. If it were me, I wouldn't back-brush the first coat of long-oil, (which is contrary to just about every other situation when I'd use long-oil), but my thinking would be to try and seal everything with the first coat and not allow remnants of pitch and/or tannin to to be brought to the surface via brushing.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Thanks for the advice / info guys, I really appreciate it. Think the best course of action is to do 2 coats of oil (slow dry) and then 2 coats of latex.
 

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I don't have any brilliant advice to add, but my house is all cedar siding; oil base primer with latex finish paint.

Doesn't seem to matter how good of a prep and paint job you do, the paint always begins to flake and pop off first on the knots. And the south (sunny) side of the house needs new paint a year or two before the other sides.

Stay on top of your paint job and it will last indefinitely.
 
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