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I tried searching for threads and came up with nothing so I'm trying here. I have to dismantle a air handler this week and generally stick to commercial carpentry but I'll have to use a torch to cut it up. I have used torches before but have never had to set the regulators. I have read all over different numbers and my buddy told me 7 for acetylene and 11 for oxygen. Then I read almost 40 for oxygen and ten for acetylene. Anyone have some advice for what you have your regulators set at. And any tips would be much appreciated.
 

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^^^^ what Tom said:thumbsup:

That's a great forum with a lot of good info on all aspects of welding/cutting.
 
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I usually turn it all up when I'm using a rose bud. But any of those numbers seem to be a good starting point
 

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It really depends on what you are cutting. I've spent many hours behind a torch and what I have found to work the best is start at 5 and 10 psi and go up from there. That's a good setting for smaller gauge metal. Anything larger just slowly increase the pressures. There is no exact pressure you have to be at. One thing I will say for sure that if you are heating a piece and it seems like it is taking a long time for it to become molten, increase your acetylene, then increase your oxygen accordingly. Just experiment with it. You'll get the hang of it quick!
 

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As Anti-wing nut said, don't exceed 15psi on the acetylene side. When you open the tanks, open the oxygen all the way, but only crack the acetylene. 1 turn max. I usually go no more than 1/2 or 3/4.

Acetylene is very unstable, and can explode. I usually keep the acetylene regulator set below 10psi, and never go above 12psi. The 15psi Anyi-wing it mentioned seems about right for maximum safe working pressure.

Acetylene is unstable above 15 psi. It is dissolved in acetone and the cylinders are filled with a porous material to keep the gas stable at the 1700 or so psi that they are pressurized to. It can also become unstable if the tank is emptied too fast, such as when using a rosebud tip with a small tank, even if the pressure is below the limit. Never withdraw more than 1/15 of the volume of the tank per hour if using continuously, or 1/10 intermittent.

Also remember that oxygen can also be a dangerous gas. Never use it to blow off you clothes or anything else. It can cause spontaneous combustion. My dad worked on an oil rig in the late 60's, early 70's. One of the guys used the oxygen tank to blow off his coveralls after work and went inside to his quarters. When he sat down and lit a cigarette he went up on flames!
 

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Remember to always keep the acetylene tank standing upright, too! If you do have to lay it on it's side for whatever reason, stand it upright for at least a half-hour or so before using it.
 

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Remember to always keep the acetylene tank standing upright, too! If you do have to lay it on it's side for whatever reason, stand it upright for at least a half-hour or so before using it.
I've used them laying down a few times...:eek:

Can you share why that's wrong?
 
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