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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have come across some termite damage in a house I am renovation.
The out side plate/ joist that sits on the foundation has extensive damage.

I was wonder if any of you fellow contractors would have any ideas on how I would get the joist remove and replaced.
Thanks for any input

TRY1
 

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1) nail a 2x4 to your wall studs ,one section or side at a time. nail at least a couple feet above the damaged area. 2) approx. every 3 feet, run a 2x4 down at a slight angle,under 2x4 nailed to wall. the shallower the angle the better. place on top of bottle type floor jacks(cheap wal-mart ones work fine.)3) proceed to raise jacks slightly. no more than a half inch or so .4) with a reciprocating saw , cut through plate and remove with hammer and small crowbar. as for your joists raise them the same way from underneath, a few feet from the damaged area. cut out damaged section and sister a board of the same width. make sure to run your sistered board back at least 4'-6' past the cut. if your wall sits on top of your joists, you can just jack up from underneath and cut out your plate,and sister your joists. to do this, you will need to remove at least a small strip of your flooring(about 6"-8" wide)so you can anchor your new plate to your foundation. in your case concrete nails will work. you'll also have to remove at least the bottom foot or so of drywall on your wall to be able to put in your nails through your plate. this sounds like a PITA, but it's not really that hard.it's also a lot cheaper than ripping it all out and building new. if this isn't detailed enough and you have questions, just holler. by the way, i have done this myself more times than i care to count, and in every place i've been, has passed code.
 

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I wouldn't mess with doing something like that if your not experience. The bottom line is this. You need to relieve the load on the sill before it can be removed. It must also be said if you don't support correctly during the removall everything could come crashing down. Also you should have posted what kind of house your working on. Meaning single story ranch or old victorian. I sure carpenter1st would have a different game plan if its a two story house not a ranch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
House is a two story built in 60's. Upstairs is two bedrooms that have been gutted.
I have replace many joist in my time just not an outside joist under wall and foundation. I realize this can be dangerous so I posted to get some other options

So what to do? My thoughts were to remove siding and sheeting outside. attach a few 2x4 perpendicular and use 15 ton tractor jacks to lift 1/4 to 1/2 inch to relive pressure and remove damaged joist. any other ideas would be great.
 

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Try1 said:
House is a two story built in 60's. Upstairs is two bedrooms that have been gutted.
I have replace many joist in my time just not an outside joist under wall and foundation. I realize this can be dangerous so I posted to get some other options

So what to do? My thoughts were to remove siding and sheeting outside. attach a few 2x4 perpendicular and use 15 ton tractor jacks to lift 1/4 to 1/2 inch to relive pressure and remove damaged joist. any other ideas would be great.

Are you talking joist or joists? How much damage? Are the little guys still active and is there some kind of a moisture problem? If it is one joist that is damaged and you think it lost it's bearing capacity, I would try to get another piece of plate behind the original plate to pick up the joist . If you were then worried about the wall bearing I would cut out enough plate to fit 2 pt 2x4's from the foundation to the subfloor. I think I could do that all without a jack, just a sledge and some driving blocks. I would think that would last a 1000 years or more. FYI termites live in the ground and will come up to feed on moist wood. If you don't see them I'm quite sure they are not living in the joist. RT
 

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Is this the bearing wall of the house...meaning all your joists and roof load are carried down to the foundation or the non bearing side? <sounds confusing. I just had to knock out a foundation wall on a two story ballon frame in the spring. It wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. I had an engineer give my a design for temp wall in the basement to hold the house up while we replaced the foundation. I thought his design was on the minimal side so I added some extra "beefing" for some piece of mind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Rob 53 said:
Are you talking joist or joists? How much damage? Are the little guys still active and is there some kind of a moisture problem? If it is one joist that is damaged and you think it lost it's bearing capacity, I would try to get another piece of plate behind the original plate to pick up the joist . If you were then worried about the wall bearing I would cut out enough plate to fit 2 pt 2x4's from the foundation to the subfloor. I think I could do that all without a jack, just a sledge and some driving blocks. I would think that would last a 1000 years or more. FYI termites live in the ground and will come up to feed on moist wood. If you don't see them I'm quite sure they are not living in the joist. RT

I have not found any active termites. So far I have found damage to one main beam that is load bearing 3 2x10's 14 feet long screwed together. One maybe two outside plates and 3 inside joist. So the damage goes from that outside plate to three or more joist next to it. I figured I would replace the three next to the outside plate. Run supports in the basements from floor to joist to keep the house from clasping then tackle the outside plate or plates.

Them little bugs can really do damage. they chewed the hell out of the hard wood floors. I am sure to find more as I progress.
 

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I take some of that back. If they are feeding between the screwed together joists you might not see them but there should be some tunnels or some path for them to get there. I consider myself an expert on termites but only in my part of the country which is quite dry. Sounds like you got some work to do so I'll defer to the other guys. RT
 
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