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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I drive by this landscaping supply place a couple towns away from me and they have a half dozen or so outdoor fireplace pre made sitting on a concrete base that can be moved around with a fork.

It got me thinking, why not build some and put them up on the website for sale. I could more then likely get the brick yard to pick them up and deliver them with their moffet for a few bucks.

Is there any downside to pre building these? Aside from them not selling of coarse.
 

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Not that I can think of,other than may be difficult to position where HO wants it.



A guy sorta close to me does it with brick mailboxes.
 

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Do a lot of custom outdoor fireplaces for customers of mine with second homes in the mountains about 5 hours from here. I pre-build all the sub frame and even put the paper and wire mesh on it here in the shop before I load it and take it to site.
It's heavy enough with just that without any masonry on it. Plus I would think repairing the cracks once I got it to site would take longer than just laying the rock on site.

If you find a system that works, let me know
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I would probably use an 8" block with #5 vertical and horizontal as much as I could then stick the rocks on. Not sure how much weight a moffit can lift but a 7 foot tall fireplace would weigh maybe 6000 pounds undressed im guessing.

A 5 hour ride would be quite the trip, I could see some flexing going on.

I think it would be worthwhile to have a product list of these on my website. Something to do in my spare time and all.

Just shooting spit balls out there.
 

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I built a steel table by my shop almost 10 years ago for pre casting foundation wall panels. The table weighs almost 10 tons. it is 10 ft. wide and 40 feet long I welded 8 5' x 10' 3/4 " plates end for end and ran 2 I beams underneath the plates,supported by timber cribbing.



The largest panel I poured was 8 ' wide 27' long and 10" thick. Lifted it off the table on to tag along trailer and set it without even a hairline crack.


I would think the fireplace could easily be done.
 

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Those panels are neat. Haven't seen them anywhere in my area of Texas. Will definitely scope them out if I see them going up somewhere. Would love to see a 20,000# table.
That has to be a monster
 

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Those panels are neat. Haven't seen them anywhere in my area of Texas. Will definitely scope them out if I see them going up somewhere. Would love to see a 20,000# table.
That has to be a monster



That table is a monster ! Each 5' x 10' x 3/4" plate weighs 1,560 lbs.And there are 8 of those puppies that is 12,480 lbs.right there,not counting 2 40' I beams beneath the plates. Probably comes out to much more than 10 tons.:laughing:



And it is dead level end to end,side to side. It is the berries,can fast track a job in no time. Can cast the foundation panels before the hole is even scratched out. No snap ties to buy,snap off,patch over,minuscule amount of form oil to buy. The nicest part.I do not need six men and three boys dragging and setting forms. The average forms needed on a 3,000 sq. ft. house on the site will fit in the back of a S-10 pick-up.:laughing:



This is the procedure; 24' x 24' garage for example. Cast four panels say 4' x 22'(whatever thickness needed). Stub re-bar out on ends for panel connections and at bottom of panels. Remove forms,bend J hooks on bottom re-bar. Dig hole, pour 4 pads on corners,dead on,set panels (footing trenches already dug) pour footings,no form needed if you choose,especially on garages,encapsulate wall panels approx. 2" both sides with concrete (is reverse key way and works slick for basements for it creates a water stop). Bend or tie corner steel together,set a few forms on corners and away you go. The concrete because it is poured on dead flat steel looks close to Formica when set. No panel seams,no snap ties to patch etc.



All the lifting hardware I buy comes from a company called Dayton Superior. Pre-casting is one heck of a time saver.
 
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