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#1 stunner
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576 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Have a customer that is wanting a new out door plug installed on there home. My question is do they make a shallow out door box or something new I am not aware of to keep this thing looking like an eye sore? The bubble covers are enough I would hate to have a huge box to ad to the looks even more.

And I really do not like the looks of this method either, I prefer everything to be flush mounted.


Worse case scenario I will have to cut out the cement board siding and rim joist but I am trying to avoid that if I can get something that looks decent.
 

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Remodeling Specialist
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112 Posts
I am in agreement with you on looks but the best i can say is looks aren't always best where water is concerned.

I use bell boxes as you have illustrated and actually drill a drain hole in the bottom too to add to safety. Seldom have I seen a good water proof flush mount that isn't prone to leak around the box edges and cause house or siding rot.

When it comes to electrical outlets on exterior applications looks are secondary to me if frame and house protection is relevant.

I have in some cases drilled and threaded old work box ears onto a Bell Box and mounted that box into a wall rimmed with silicone and then the cover added flush to the surface it if I needed to.
 

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#1 stunner
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576 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I will probably just end up doing the bell box like always in this situation even though I hate the looks it is the fastest method. I really would like to try what is pictured but I don't have time to order one because I got to do it first thing in the morning, I may call them and see if I can get more time to order one of these flush mounts.
 

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Philadelphia electrician
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346 Posts
I like it...

I did a new house with the Arlington boxes for a construction cost management consultant [trades related field].
He got a fix on them from an architect we both knew. [That was how we met]
Three outside receptacles.
The boxes worked well for the purpose and looked really nice. However, I am an old fogey and anything made of plastic, that is supposed to provide effectively permanent service, always makes me cringe.
 

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Banned
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490 Posts
I like the ones from Arlington Products and my customers do too. We'll see what they look like in 30 years. When I use the bubble covers on a separate box, (Taymac) I dont feel like I ever get that Gasket to compress enough. And it does look ugly as well.
 

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Banned
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490 Posts
Personally, I wish they would just require in use covers in all wet or damp locations. I frequently see non in-use covers in wet locations in my area. Sometimes no GFCI protection either. Lots of builders, handymen, etc. simply do not know the difference and have probably never heard of the NEC. No licensing, permits, etc around here on any level, state or local.
 

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I own stock in FotoMat!
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12,985 Posts
Personally, I wish they would just require in use covers in all wet or damp locations. I frequently see non in-use covers in wet locations in my area. Sometimes no GFCI protection either. Lots of builders, handymen, etc. simply do not know the difference and have probably never heard of the NEC. No licensing, permits, etc around here on any level, state or local.

If the have no license, permits, never heard of the NEC, etc., what good would requiring in-use covers everywhere be? They'll be just as ignorant of a new rule as they are of the existing ones.
 

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Thom
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4,137 Posts
It seems to me the in-use covers are often counterproductive. After the homeowner breaks the cover there's no protection.
 

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If the have no license, permits, never heard of the NEC, etc., what good would requiring in-use covers everywhere be? They'll be just as ignorant of a new rule as they are of the existing ones.


Yes,
I did not communicate what I was thinking. If non in-use covers were not available (no UL listing) they would not be available for these guys to purchase and install. But, I suppose that if my uncle had peddles and handlebars he would be a bicycle.
Of course, there has always been poor electrical work and always will be. It is not always the easiest thing to communicate to my customers that there is a difference between hiring a qualified electrician and a carpenter or handyman. "Qualified" is a subjective term in an area with no licensing requirements or permits.
I strive to make my work compliant with the requirements of the NEC. It is the only way that I feel I can judge the quality of my own work. Plus, it is the only way that I can think of to CYA myself.
 

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Philadelphia electrician
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346 Posts
Personally, I wish they would just require in use covers in all wet or damp locations. I frequently see non in-use covers in wet locations in my area. Sometimes no GFCI protection either. Lots of builders, handymen, etc. simply do not know the difference and have probably never heard of the NEC. No licensing, permits, etc around here on any level, state or local.
...and when they DO eventually mandate licensing [and they will, because they eventually watch EVERYTHING everyone does] either these jokers will be grandfathered in or YOU will have to fit through the eye of a needle to get licensed [or both]

I recommend that you start work on documenting your training and experience so you can defend your claim to be suitable for licensing when the time comes.
Join or start a local electrical contractors association and look into IAEI membership.
[I would start accumulating Continuing Ed credits as well]
 

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Banned
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...and when they DO eventually mandate licensing [and they will, because they eventually watch EVERYTHING everyone does] either these jokers will be grandfathered in or YOU will have to fit through the eye of a needle to get licensed [or both]

I recommend that you start work on documenting your training and experience so you can defend your claim to be suitable for licensing when the time comes.
Join or start a local electrical contractors association and look into IAEI membership.
[I would start accumulating Continuing Ed credits as well]

Those are some thoughtful points.

Thanks
 
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