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Discussion Starter #1
...as a company. We did this at the beginning of the summer last year.
 

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Nice job! Doesn't look like you had a whole lot to start with, mucho rot.
 

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Painting Contractor
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Discussion Starter #5
donb1959 said:
Very nice. How did you patch those huge gapeing holes?

Thanks!

We basically pulled out all the vertical boards, got rid of all the old plaster that wanted to come down, (the lathe wasn't in too bad of shape surprisingly.) keyed whatever plaster was left. Replaced the vertical boards with new ones, then just replastered the holes, I forget the exact product, some sort of exterior concrete, it took two coats.

We didn't worry too much about matching the old pattern, we did try to get as close as possible. The homeowner knew that we weren't plaster guys, she didn't care. We ended up saveing her about $1500 by not subing one of the local plaster contractors we got qoutes from. She was/is a friend of ours.

Yea I hope we do get a lot of mileage out these pictures, I have quite a few more before shots that show the damage up close. The end of this job warented a celabratory drink (or 2) at the local pub. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
donb1959 said:
Another question. How did you traverse that roof. That's a serious pitch...what is it about 25' to the gable?
I think it was about 21' to 25'. we put up scafolding on the side of the building. Then nailed a level plank to the scafolding and laid it on the roof (see picture below). We then seperated one of our 24' ladders and laid the half section onto two roofers jacks. It was pretty easy to stand on the laid out ladder and plank and reach everything with a brush and trowl. In the picture you can see the jacks and plank. The scafolding was 3 teir (sp?).

I know there was probabley a better way to do this but we didn't want to blow our profit by buying a whole lot more infrastructure. I think we did pretty good with the resourses we had avaliable to us. The scafolding we borowed from my uncle, who is also my partners father.
 

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"Buy Quality, Cry Once"
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Humble Abode said:
I think it was about 21' to 25'. we put up scafolding on the side of the building. Then nailed a level plank to the scafolding and laid it on the roof (see picture below). We then seperated one of our 24' ladders and laid the half section onto two roofers jacks. It was pretty easy to stand on the laid out ladder and plank and reach everything with a brush and trowl. In the picture you can see the jacks and plank. The scafolding was 3 teir (sp?).

I know there was probabley a better way to do this but we didn't want to blow our profit by buying a whole lot more infrastructure. I think we did pretty good with the resourses we had avaliable to us. The scafolding we borowed from my uncle, who is also my partners father.
Ok...still confused. What is holding the plank to the roof? I can't tell from the pic. And I still don't understand the half ladder, jack scenario.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
donb1959 said:
Ok...still confused. What is holding the plank to the roof? I can't tell from the pic. And I still don't understand the half ladder, jack scenario.

Nothing is actually holding the plank to the roof except for pressure, but it is nailed to a firmly secured plank on the scafolding, to keep it from sliding down and out when you're standing on it.

Those blue thingies that are staggered about 3' apart are roofers jacks (I forget the proper name). They lay under the shingle and get nailed down. A 24' aluminium ladder seperates to get two 12' ladders. We took one half of a 24' extension ladder and sat two of the rungs into the roof jacks where you would usually lay a level plank for roofing. Then the ladder would lay flat on the roof and you could walk up and down it.

I wish I had taken a picture of it with the ladder up there. I hope this is a little clearer. Picture the bottom of the ladder right where the plank hits the roof and laying flat on the roof and continueing up to the top parralel with the stucco surface we were working on.
 

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Painting Contractor
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LOL I'm using up all my alotted server space with this one thread. I need to get a website :)
 

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That third "panel" still looks like quite a stretch.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
ProWallGuy said:
All I can say is Thank God we don't do exteriors.
I love exteriors. I have been looking foward to getting back on our ladders all winter :)
 

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Exteriors may rule up north. I prefer to work once the A/C is operational.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Teetorbilt said:
Exteriors may rule up north. I prefer to work once the A/C is operational.

I can understand that. It gets warm up here during the summer but nothing like the temperatures you guys in the south have to deal with. I would want to work inside too.
 

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When I started, as a one man band, I grabbed everything. Here that means rot. Soffits, facia and shingle mould mostly. It only took a few months in the summer to figure out that I needed to do something else. Nothing like being hot, sweaty and covered with 30 yrs. of dead insect parts (and a few live ones) to make you reconsider your business plan. LOL
 
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