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Super Moderator
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the flip house we just sold, the previous owner left behind 35 gallons of hydrofluoric acid. I removed it from the house before the buyers moved in, as I didn't want it left there for their 5 children to access. Figured I would call my county recycle place, and they would direct me how to deal with it.

Fast forward, one month, dozen phone calls, and a few emails, and it still sits in my garage, as nobody knows what to do with it. I am reaching out to you guys, to see if anyone knows a profession that may be able to put this stuff to good, safe use. According to Google, the main use is in refrigeration, but it is also used to etch metals. I only want to move this stuff one final time, as the 25 gallon container is awkward and heavy, not to mention extremely hazardous.
 

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Contact a hazmat company after dropping it off the side of the road that is if you don't die transporting it.
 

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Goin' Down in Flames....
Highwayman
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Dilute it by S. L. O. W. L. Y. Pouring water into it.






😳





Sorry I’m not being helpful. 🤣
 

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Design Build
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Can you mix it with some kind of equivalent base and therefore neutralize it into a salty compound that can be safely poured back onto the earth
 

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Radical Basement Dweller
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You could call these guys who sell it and ask for their advice.

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Looked into neutralizing it, but you guys are correct that only small amounts at a time. A chemical engineer friend in working to find a solution also, and has told me this stuff is really bad, so not sure I wanna be pouring, mixing, etc. I think Joe Ordinary Citizen would make one phone call and then abandon it somewhere. I am no tree hugger, but wanna do the right thing. Shouldn't be this hard.

Robies link is in Texas. One place I called was gonna let me drop it off, but heir closest location was 250 miles from me (Ohio).
 

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Butcher of wood and metal
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That's the trouble with recycling some stuff. They want you to do it, but provide no place for it.

Sent from my SM-A115A using Tapatalk
 

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Stelzer Painting Inc.
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198 Posts
In the flip house we just sold, the previous owner left behind 35 gallons of hydrofluoric acid. I removed it from the house before the buyers moved in, as I didn't want it left there for their 5 children to access. Figured I would call my county recycle place, and they would direct me how to deal with it.

Fast forward, one month, dozen phone calls, and a few emails, and it still sits in my garage, as nobody knows what to do with it. I am reaching out to you guys, to see if anyone knows a profession that may be able to put this stuff to good, safe use. According to Google, the main use is in refrigeration, but it is also used to etch metals. I only want to move this stuff one final time, as the 25 gallon container is awkward and heavy, not to mention extremely hazardous.
I also have a 5 gallon bucket of hydrofluoric acid, but not by accident. In commercial & industrial pressure washing it's used primarily for aluminum brightening, and to a lesser extent, fleet washing. Contact a local pressure washing company, (one who does commercial work), and they'll gladly take it off your hands.
 

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Punching above his weight
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I can't believe you moved it once!

If no solution is available, built a big box around it, fasten that box to the concrete floor, and sell the house as is. Not your problem any more.
 

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Premium Member
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Call your local college chemistry professor.
Call your local fire department and ask for the supervisor of the hazmat response team OR the Fire Chief.
Call poison control.
Edit: If none of those work try Facebook marketplace or as a last resort craigslist.
 

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Super Moderator
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Call your local college chemistry professor.
Call your local fire department and ask for the supervisor for the hazmat response team.
Call poison control.

Edit: If none of those work try Facebook marketplace or as a last resort craigslist.
Son in law is a firefighter, he was no help. Customer of mine is a chemical engineer. He got involved a couple days ago, and is currently looking for a solution through his contacts. It just blows my mind that I have worked so many avenues, and am not even close to a solution.
 
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