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Justin K
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for options for the best way (cost effective) to prep old wood siding & trim for painting. It does have lead paint on it now. I just got Lead RRP certified last week. I am bidding on a job now. I plan on sanding the entire house with a festool rotex 125 hooked up to a festool hepa vac.

Is there a better way?

Is the "paint shaver" a good tool/option?

Thanks
 

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it depends how thick the paint is. If you've got more than 3 coats of paint on there, you're going to be sanding for an eternity and changing paper every 30 seconds. I have personal, intimate experience with a metabo paint shaver.

Pros:
gets down to bare wood
takes off most paint easily
most of the debris gets collected via vacuum
faster than a heat gun


Cons:
on the real tough/thick lead paint, it takes a few passes
must set nails prior to shaving to avoid blade breakage
still takes quite awhile
its loud as hell
still have to sand
pretty easy to grind a hole in siding if not careful
 

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Deter has it.

Consumables can be $$$ when you're taking off the paint. Pretty much the last step is sanding, no matter what else you do.
 

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Why not set-up a negative pressure containment using a HEPA-filtered negative air machine, with a planer inside, remove the siding, and run it through the planer? It could be a room or a trailer. The lead soaks / infuses into the wood, so the new paint will test as lead-based paint unless some (very little) of the wood is removed. This approach would also make wiring, plumbing, and insulation work very easy.
 

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Why not set-up a negative pressure containment using a HEPA-filtered negative air machine, with a planer inside, remove the siding, and run it through the planer? It could be a room or a trailer. The lead soaks / infuses into the wood, so the new paint will test as lead-based paint unless some (very little) of the wood is removed. This approach would also make wiring, plumbing, and insulation work very easy.
Because it would cost a billion dollars?
 

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Why is it necessary to completely remove all of the existing paint?

For all the abrasives and labor costs you will incur, if it HAS to all be removed, you're better off investing in 100 gals. of Peel-Away and having at it. :eek:

I'd love to hear some answers on this.

As far as I'm concerned, going down to bare wood would be my option of last resort (possibly a hair ahead of residing the whole house).
 

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FStephenMasek said:
Why not set-up a negative pressure containment using a HEPA-filtered negative air machine, with a planer inside, remove the siding, and run it through the planer? It could be a room or a trailer. The lead soaks / infuses into the wood, so the new paint will test as lead-based paint unless some (very little) of the wood is removed. This approach would also make wiring, plumbing, and insulation work very easy.
You could bid the job this way, if you like giving out bids so people can laugh at your price...
 

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Why not set-up a negative pressure containment using a HEPA-filtered negative air machine, with a planer inside, remove the siding, and run it through the planer? It could be a room or a trailer. The lead soaks / infuses into the wood, so the new paint will test as lead-based paint unless some (very little) of the wood is removed. This approach would also make wiring, plumbing, and insulation work very easy.
Since you have so much money, kindly send all of what you have to me;)

FS you must think all HO with lead paint are rolling in cash.
 

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Why not set-up a negative pressure containment using a HEPA-filtered negative air machine, with a planer inside, remove the siding, and run it through the planer? It could be a room or a trailer. The lead soaks / infuses into the wood, so the new paint will test as lead-based paint unless some (very little) of the wood is removed. This approach would also make wiring, plumbing, and insulation work very easy.
Operational cost aside, I think you'd be turning an RRP project into a remediation project, which would be a blunder, including for the OP, who is RRP probably.
 

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Why is it necessary to completely remove all of the existing paint?

For all the abrasives and labor costs you will incur, if it HAS to all be removed, you're better off investing in 100 gals. of Peel-Away and having at it. :eek:

I'd love to hear some answers on this.

As far as I'm concerned, going down to bare wood would be my option of last resort (possibly a hair ahead of residing the whole house).
Depending on the layers, you probably won't get to bare wood with one application. Before the RRP laws came around, I did some large area stripping tests on 100+ year old clapboards. Peel Away 1 wasn't all that magical, but what you could do is use a lye based liquid stripper, wet the wall really well, then put the stripper on, let it work for maybe 1/2 hour and hose it off. Any degraded wood fibers get removed in the process, so the surface is pretty good to work with, from an adhesion point of view. The grain shows up, due to differential weathering / removal of the fibers. Way cheaper and way faster than Peel Away.

This is a total no-no under RRP.

When I get a chance, I have some other ideas for removal that will be RRP complaint and fast, but I'm way behind on a bunch of stuff, and it seems the be getting worse:whistling
 

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Paint Shaver Pro works really well. Last summer, I removed (nearly) all the paint from 80-year old clapboard siding on a 1-story bungalow - following RRP guidelines. I could strip about 1/3 - 1/2 of each side in a day. (And for the record, my guys weren't really much faster!) Then, it took a few more days of sanding to prep the surface for paint. It wasn't the most enjoyable way to spend a nice summer day but it wasn't totally awful. If you go this route, I recommend the 8 amp model, Tyvek suits and lots of cold beer!
 

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Why not set-up a negative pressure containment using a HEPA-filtered negative air machine, with a planer inside, remove the siding, and run it through the planer? It could be a room or a trailer. The lead soaks / infuses into the wood, so the new paint will test as lead-based paint unless some (very little) of the wood is removed. This approach would also make wiring, plumbing, and insulation work very easy.
In practice, you take the boards off, clean the edge, and flip them when you put them back on. Typically this is done when the building envelop needs work, bit I know of one large building that the whole thing was done this way to get good paint surfaces. Doesn't work with all siding:whistling
 

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Depending on the layers, you probably won't get to bare wood with one application. Before the RRP laws came around, I did some large area stripping tests on 100+ year old clapboards. Peel Away 1 wasn't all that magical, but what you could do is use a lye based liquid stripper, wet the wall really well, then put the stripper on, let it work for maybe 1/2 hour and hose it off. Any degraded wood fibers get removed in the process, so the surface is pretty good to work with, from an adhesion point of view. The grain shows up, due to differential weathering / removal of the fibers. Way cheaper and way faster than Peel Away.

This is a total no-no under RRP.

When I get a chance, I have some other ideas for removal that will be RRP complaint and fast, but I'm way behind on a bunch of stuff, and it seems the be getting worse:whistling
I've used Peel-Away 2 and had good results on small scale restorations, like columns, intricate architectural woodwork and such. 10 + layers.

Seems like I'm doing a lot of old farmhouse remodels these days and I just can't see sanding or scraping as a better option.

Love to hear these RRP compliant ideas.
 

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Whatever you use ... from the law ...

The use of machines designed to remove paint or other surface coatings through high speed operation such as sanding, grinding, power planing, needle gun, abrasive blasting, or sandblasting, is prohibited on painted surfaces unless such machines have shrouds or containment systems and are equipped with a HEPA vacuum attachment to collect dust and debris at the point of generation. Machines must be operated so that no visible dust or release of air occurs outside the shroud or containment system.
 

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Justin K
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for all the replies. I like the idea of using the paint shaver first & then sanding. I'm just having a hard time determining how long either process will actually take.

Thanks again
 

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Justin K
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Paint Shaver Pro works really well. Last summer, I removed (nearly) all the paint from 80-year old clapboard siding on a 1-story bungalow - following RRP guidelines. I could strip about 1/3 - 1/2 of each side in a day. (And for the record, my guys weren't really much faster!) Then, it took a few more days of sanding to prep the surface for paint. It wasn't the most enjoyable way to spend a nice summer day but it wasn't totally awful. If you go this route, I recommend the 8 amp model, Tyvek suits and lots of cold beer!
Thanks for the response & including how long it actually took you. Appreciate it!
 

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If the only task is repainting, removing the siding would be costly. If it is a remodel, removing the siding generates cost savings on other tasks. All of that hand labor and the materials to remove the old paint with tools and sanders is surely not free. On the one-story bungalow example above, there is 14 man-days of work and the materials. Siding goes through a surface planer (and a jointer for the edges) very quickly. Would there be 14 man days to remove and reinstall the siding?
 

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If the only task is repainting, removing the siding would be costly. If it is a remodel, removing the siding generates cost savings on other tasks. All of that hand labor and the materials to remove the old paint with tools and sanders is surely not free. On the one-story bungalow example above, there is 14 man-days of work and the materials. Siding goes through a surface planer (and a jointer for the edges) very quickly. Would there be 14 man days to remove and reinstall the siding?
Absolutely.

Start factoring in the reality that on a 100 yr old structure, depending on the species of wood, fasteners....etc, you will be lucky to get 70% of the siding off in tact.

Last one I did was poplar. Just setting the nails caused a lot of repairs to be necessary. Try pulling those nails out of 5/4 old growth oak sheathing.

There are so many time consuming, and possibly costly variables involved with solely the removal portion of that kind of job.

Ferrarri....meet brick wall.
 
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